EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English fleme, fleom, from Old French flieme, flemie (open vein), probably via a Proto-Germanic source (compare Old Saxon flēma, Old High German fliotuma, fliodema, Old English flȳtme, flītme (fleam, lancet)), borrowed from Vulgar Latin fletoma, *fletomus, from Late Latin flebotomus, phlebotomus, from Ancient Greek φλεβοτόμον (phlebotómon). Compare French flamme, Dutch vlijm, German Fliete, Danish flitte (fleam). Doublet of phlebotome.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

fleam (plural fleams)

  1. A sharp instrument used to open a vein, to lance gums, or the like.
HypernymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English fleem, flem (the rushing of water; current), probably from Old English flēam (fleeing; flight; rush), from Proto-Germanic *flaumaz (stream; current; flood), from Proto-Indo-European *plew- (to fly; flow; run). Cognate with Norwegian Nynorsk flaum (flood).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

fleam (plural fleams)

  1. (Britain, dialectal, Northern England) The watercourse or runoff from a mill; millstream
  2. (Britain, dialectal, Northern England) A large trench or gully cut into a meadow in order to drain it
Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

fleam

  1. first-person singular present active subjunctive of fleō

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *flaumaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flēam m

  1. escape, flight
    Fram sagum ne biþ nān flēam: hīe nabbaþ nānne anġinn and nānne ende.
    There is no escape from stories: they have no beginning and no end.
    Þā ġeflogenan rǣplingas sind nū ġīet on flēame.
    The escaped prisoners are still on the run (literally "in flight" or "in an escape").

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit