foreward

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

fore +‎ -ward

NounEdit

foreward (plural forewards)

  1. (obsolete) An advance group; the vanguard.

Etymology 2Edit

AdverbEdit

foreward

  1. Misspelling of forward.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English foreward (forward), equivalent to fore +‎ -warde.

AdjectiveEdit

foreward

  1. forward

AdverbEdit

foreward

  1. forward

Alternative formsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: forward
  • Scots: forrit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English foreweard, foreward (condition, bargain, agreement, contract, treaty, assurance), equivalent to fore- +‎ ward (ward, keeping). Compare Dutch voorwaarde (condition, terms, proviso, stipulation).

NounEdit

foreward (plural forewards)

  1. agreement, contract, treaty, bargain, covenant; terms of an agreement; pledge or promise
    • c. 1390, Piers Plowman:
      Pers, I plihte þe my trouþe To folfulle þe Foreward.
    • c. 1475, Wicliffe (attr.), An Apology for Lollard Doctrines:
      To tak or ȝef temporal þing for goostly þing of forþword or certeyn couenaunt, it is symonye.
Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfo.reˌwɑrd/, [ˈfo.reˌwɑrˠd]

Etymology 1Edit

AdjectiveEdit

foreward

  1. Alternative form of foreweard
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

foreward f (nominative plural forewarde)

  1. Alternative form of foreweard
DeclensionEdit