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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

fore +‎ -ward

NounEdit

foreward (plural forewards)

  1. (obsolete) An advance group; the vanguard.
    • The Tragedy of Richard the Third (V.iii.403-04), Shakespeare
      My foreward shall be drawn out all in length, Consisting equally of horse and foot.

Etymology 2Edit

AdverbEdit

foreward

  1. Misspelling of forward.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English fōreward (forward), equivalent to fore +‎ -warde.

AdjectiveEdit

foreward

  1. forward

AdverbEdit

foreward

  1. forward

Alternative formsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: forward
  • Scots: forrit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English foreweard, fōreward (condition, bargain, agreement, contract, treaty, assurance), equivalent to fore- +‎ ward (ward, keeping). Compare Dutch voorwaarde (condition, terms, proviso, stipulation).

NounEdit

foreward (plural forewards)

  1. agreement, contract, treaty, bargain, covenant; terms of an agreement; pledge or promise
    • c. 1390, Piers Plowman:
      Pers, I plihte þe my trouþe To folfulle þe Foreward.
    • c. 1475, Wicliffe (attr.), An Apology for Lollard Doctrines:
      To tak or ȝef temporal þing for goostly þing of forþword or certeyn couenaunt, it is symonye.
Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfoːrewɑrd/, [ˈfoːrewɑrˠd]

Etymology 1Edit

From fore- +‎ -weard.

AdjectiveEdit

fōreward

  1. forward, fore, former, early, prior
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From fore- +‎ ward (ward, keeping).

NounEdit

fōreward f (nominative plural fōrewarde)

  1. an agreement, compact, treaty
    His bróðer griþ and fórewarde eall æftercwæþ — His brother renounced peace and treaties.
DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • 2010, J. Bosworth, An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online (T. N. Toller & Others, Eds.), foreward