fragile

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French fragile, from Latin fragilis, formed on frag-, the root of frangere (to break). Cognate fraction, fracture and doublet of frail.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fragile (comparative fragiler or more fragile, superlative fragilest or most fragile)

  1. Easily broken or destroyed, and thus often of subtle or intricate structure.
    The chemist synthesizes a fragile molecule.
    The UN tries to maintain the fragile peace process in the region.
    He is a very fragile person and gets easily depressed.
  2. (UK) Feeling weak or easily disturbed as a result of illness.

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TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

fragile (plural fragiles)

  1. Something that is fragile.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin fragilis. Doublet of frêle.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fragile (plural fragiles)

  1. fragile

Derived termsEdit

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Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fragile

  1. inflection of fragil:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fragilis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfra.d͡ʒi.le/
  • Rhymes: -adʒile
  • Hyphenation: frà‧gi‧le

AdjectiveEdit

fragile (plural fragili, superlative fragilissimo)

  1. fragile

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • fragile in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fragile

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular of fragilis