durable

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin dūrābilis ‎(lasting, permanent), from dūrō ‎(harden, make hard).

AdjectiveEdit

durable ‎(comparative more durable, superlative most durable)

  1. Able to resist wear, decay; lasting; enduring.

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AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

durable ‎(plural durables)

  1. (economics) A durable good, one useful over more than one period, especially a year.
    • The theory of the cost-of-living index‎, Robert A. Pollak, , page 188:
      In a frictionless world with perfect rental markets, there is an unambiguous cost associated with the use of a durable for a single period.

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AsturianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

durable (epicene, plural durables)

  1. durable (able to resist wear; enduring)

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dūrābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

durable m, f ‎(plural durables)

  1. durable
  2. sustainable

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SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dūrābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

durable m, f ‎(plural durables)

  1. durable

SynonymsEdit

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