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A police mugshot of the American former financier and investment advisor Bernard “Bernie” Madoff taken in March 2009. Madoff was convicted of operating a Ponzi scheme considered to be the largest financial fraud in United States history.

From Old French fraudulence, from Latin fraudulentia (deceitfulness, disposition to defraud; fraudulence), from fraudulentus (deceitful, fraudulent) + -ia (suffix forming abstract nouns). Fraudulentus is derived from fraus (deceit, fraud) (from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrew- (to mislead)) + -ulentus (suffix forming adjectives meaning ‘abounding in, full of’).



fraudulence (countable and uncountable, plural fraudulences)

  1. The condition of being fraudulent; deceitfulness.
    • 2012 January 7, B. R. Myers, “Dynasty, North Korean-style”, in The New York Times[1], archived from the original on 8 January 2012:
      We should therefore not make too much of the fraudulence of all that on-screen wailing. Just because North Korean TV never films anything before rehearsing all spontaneity out of it does not mean the average citizen was unmoved.

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