fraudulent

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English fraudulent, from Old French fraudulent, from Latin fraudulentus, from fraus.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfɹɔː.dʒʊ.lənt/, /ˈfɹɔː.djʊ.lənt/, /ˈfɹɔː.dʒə.lənt/, /ˈfɹɔː.djə.lənt/, /ˈfɹɔːdʒ.lənt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfɹɔ.dʒə.lənt/, /ˈfɹɑdʒ.lənt/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

fraudulent (comparative more fraudulent, superlative most fraudulent)

  1. Dishonest; based on fraud or deception.
    • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie, London: William Stansbye, published 1622, book III, page 98:
      Secondly, Philoſophy which we are warned not to take heed of : not that Philoſophy, which is true & found knowledge attained by naturall diſcourſe of reaſon ; but that Philoſophy which to bolſter hereſie or error, caſteth a fraudulent ſhew of reaſon vpon things which are indeed vnreaſonable, & by that meane as by a ſtratageme ſpoyleth the ſimple which are not able to withſtand ſuch cunning.
    • a. 1729, Samuel Clarke, “The Reward of Justice”, in The Works of Samuel Clarke, volume II, London: J. and P. Knapton, published 1738, page 191:
      The only reaſon, why men are not always ſufficiently ſenſible of This ; ſo that Many, who are very Juſt in their Dealings between Man and Man, will yet be very fraudulent or rapacious with regard to the Publick ; is becauſe, in this latter caſe, ’tis not ſo obviouſly and immediately apparent uppon Whom the Injury falls, as it is in the caſe of Private Wrongs.
    • 1827, Thomas Babington Macaulay, “Machiavelli”, in Critical and Historical Essays: Contributed to The Edinburgh Review, volume I, new edition, London: Printed for Longman et al., published 1850, page 28:
      One writer gravely assures us that Maurice of Saxony learned all his fraudulent policy from that execrable volume [The Prince].
  2. False, phony.
    He tried to pass a fraudulent check.

CollocationsEdit

SynonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fraudulentus.

AdjectiveEdit

fraudulent (feminine fraudulenta, masculine plural fraudulents, feminine plural fraudulentes)

  1. fraudulent

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French fraudulent, itself borrowed from Latin fraudulentus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfrau̯diu̯lɛnt/, /ˈfrau̯dilɛnt/

AdjectiveEdit

fraudulent

  1. Dishonest, fraudulent; based on fraud.
  2. Necrotic, rotting; infected with or afflicted with gangrene.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: fraudulent

ReferencesEdit