fulcrum

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

The triangle is the fulcrum.

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fulcrum ‎(bedpost, foot of a couch), from fulciō ‎(prop up, support).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfʌlk.rəm/UK also /ˈfʊlk.rəm/
  • (file)

NounEdit

fulcrum ‎(plural fulcrums or fulcra)

  1. (mechanics) The support about which a lever pivots.
    • It is possible to flick food across the table using your fork as a lever and your finger as a fulcrum.
    • 2010, John Allison, Bad Machinery
      MILDRED: Archimedes said give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it and I will move the world.
      CHARLOTTE: Yeah she said that twaddle eight or nine times.
    • 2012 March 1, Henry Petroski, “Opening Doors”[1], American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 112-3:
      A doorknob of whatever roundish shape is effectively a continuum of levers, with the axis of the latching mechanism—known as the spindle—being the fulcrum about which the turning takes place.

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From fulciō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fulcrum n ‎(genitive fulcrī); second declension

  1. bedpost
  2. foot (of a couch)
  3. couch

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative fulcrum fulcra
genitive fulcrī fulcrōrum
dative fulcrō fulcrīs
accusative fulcrum fulcra
ablative fulcrō fulcrīs
vocative fulcrum fulcra

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • fulcrum” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
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