English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɡlɒp/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒp

Etymology 1 edit

Variation of glope.

Verb edit

glop (third-person singular simple present glops, present participle glopping, simple past and past participle glopped)

  1. (dialectal or archaic) To stare in amazement.

Etymology 2 edit

1940-45, of expressive origin. Compare goop, gulp.

Noun edit

glop (countable and uncountable, plural glops)

  1. (informal, uncountable) Any gooey substance.
    • 2012, Kathryn Lasky, Chasing Orion, page 308:
      He inserted the needle, and in about thirty seconds the most disgusting greenish glop started to drop into the bowl.
  2. (informal, countable) A gooey blob of some substance.
    • 1967-1969, Lou Sullivan, personal diary, quoted in 2019, Ellis Martin, Zach Ozma (editors), We Both Laughed In Pleasure
      Got out a jack knife & scraped glops of wax off the floor.
    • 2015, Kristen L. Middleton, W. J. May, Suzy Turner, Darlings of Darkness:
      Kylarai studied me as I picked a glop of mascara from one lash.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

glop (third-person singular simple present glops, present participle glopping, simple past and past participle glopped)

  1. (transitive, informal) To apply (a liquid) thickly and messily.
    • 2012, Courtney Milan, The Duchess War:
      He unscrewed the top from the pot, dipped the stick in, and clumsily glopped the white mess onto the handbill Minnie was holding. “You are an untidy paster.”
  2. (transitive, archaic) To swallow greedily.

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

glop m (plural glops)

  1. gulp, sip
    un glop de cafèa sip of coffee

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Related to West Frisian gloppe (alley), Old Norse gloppa (mountain gorge), Norwegian glop (opening, hole), Icelandic glopa, Faroese gloppa (ajar); per Kroonen, all from Proto-Germanic *gluppa (open space), a derivative of *gluppōn (yawning, being open), from Pre-Germanic *glub-n-, *glub-, from which also gleuf (slit, opening).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

glop n (plural gloppen, diminutive glopje n)

  1. (Northern, dialectal) opening, hole, crevice
  2. (Holland, dialectal) alley, narrow passage, narrow street
  3. (Northern, dialectal) open space, clearing

References edit

  • Kroonen, Guus (2013), “gluppa”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 181-82

Further reading edit