See also: opẹn

English edit

 
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Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

 
A sign indicating that a shop is open

From Middle English open, from Old English open (open), from Proto-West Germanic *opan, from Proto-Germanic *upanaz (open), from Proto-Indo-European *upo (up from under, over).

Cognate with Scots apen (open), Saterland Frisian eepen (open), West Frisian iepen (open), Dutch open (open), Low German open, apen (open), German offen (open), Danish åben (open), Swedish öppen (open), Norwegian Bokmål åpen (open), Norwegian Nynorsk open (open), Icelandic opinn (open). Compare also Latin supinus (on one's back, supine), Albanian hap (to open). Related to up.

Adjective edit

open (comparative more open, superlative most open)

  1. (usually not comparable) Not closed.
    1. Able to be accessed (physically).
    2. Able to have something pass through or along it.
      Turn left after the second open door.
    3. (of a body part) Not covered; showing what is inside.
      It was as if his body had gone to sleep standing up and with his eyes open.
    4. (of a sandwich, etc.) Composed of a single slice of bread with a topping.
      Synonyms: open-face, open-faced
      • 2001, Jennie Walters, Caz’s Birthday Blues (Party Girls)‎[1], London: Hodder Children’s Books, →ISBN:
        Starry food is fun to make. You can buy bright yellow American mustard (which isn’t too strong!) in squeezy bottles and pipe stars on to hot dogs and open burgers or sandwiches.
      • 2012, Jo McAuley, “[Meat and Poultry] Turkey Burgers with Spicy Salsa”, in Hamlyn QuickCook: Low Fat, London: Hamlyn, →ISBN, page 152:
        When the burgers are ready, place them on the toasted rolls with the romaine lettuce leaves and top with the salsa. Serve as open burgers.
      • 2015, Michael Robotham, chapter 17, in Close Your Eyes, London: Sphere, →ISBN, page 133:
        Sunday morning in Wellow and we feast on open bagels with grilled ham, tomato and Swiss cheese, requested and highly praised.
  2. Not physically drawn together, closed, folded or contracted; extended.
    an open hand; an open flower
  3. (not comparable) Actively conducting or prepared to conduct business.
    Banks are not open on bank holidays.
    • 2013 July 20, “The attack of the MOOCs”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8845:
      Since the launch early last year of […] two Silicon Valley start-ups offering free education through MOOCs, massive open online courses, the ivory towers of academia have been shaken to their foundations. University brands built in some cases over centuries have been forced to contemplate the possibility that information technology will rapidly make their existing business model obsolete.
  4. (comparable) Receptive.
    I am open to new ideas.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), London: [] Robert Barker, [], →OCLC, Acts 19:38:
      Wherefore if Demetrius [] have a matter against any man, the law is open and there are deputies.
    • c. 1596–1599 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Second Part of Henry the Fourth, []”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act V, scene ii]:
      The service that I truly did his life, / Hath left me open to all injuries.
    • 2005, Pamela J. Carter, Susan Lewsen, Lippincott's Textbook for Nursing Assistants, page 277:
      When the top sheet, blanket, and bedspread of a closed bed are turned back, or fanfolded, the closed bed becomes an open bed, or a bed ready to receive a patient or resident.
    • 2021 April 2, Ciara Nugent, “Can Public Transit Survive the Pandemic? London's New Transport Commissioner Wants You to Believe It Can”, in Time[2]:
      A U.K. survey found attitudes toward public transit had been set back by two decades, with only 43% of drivers open to using their car less, even if public transport improves.
  5. (not comparable) Public
    He published an open letter to the governor on a full page of The New York Times.
    • c. 1597 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Merry Wiues of Windsor”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act I, scene iii]:
      His thefts were too open.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book III”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], →OCLC; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, →OCLC:
      That I may find him, and with secret gaze / Or open admiration him behold.
    • 2001, Xiaopei He, “Chinese Queer (Tongzhi) Women Organizing in the 1990s”, in Ping-Chun Hsiung, Maria Jaschok, Cecilia Milwertz, Red Chan, editors, Chinese Women Organizing: Cadres, Feminists, Muslims, Queers[3], Berg, →ISBN, →LCCN, →OCLC, page 41:
      Due to severe and pervasive discrimination, people dared not be open about their homosexuality, and because no one would be open, social prejudice and discrimination became even stronger.
  6. (not comparable) With open access, of open science, or both.
    hopes for all aspects of the project being open rather than paywalled
  7. (not comparable) Candid, ingenuous, not subtle in character.
    The man is an open book.
  8. (now regional) Mild (of the weather); free from frost or snow.
    • c. 1794, Jane Austen, Lady Susan:
      He desires me to tell you that the present open weather induces him to accept Mr Vernon's invitation to prolong his stay in Sussex that they may have some hunting together.
  9. (mathematics, logic, of a formula) Having a free variable.
  10. (mathematics, topology, of a set) Which is part of a predefined collection of subsets of  , that defines a topological space on  .
  11. (graph theory, of a walk) Whose first and last vertices are different.
  12. (computing, not comparable, of a file, document, etc.) In current use; connected to as a resource.
    I couldn't save my changes because another user had the same file open.
  13. (engineering, gas and liquid flow, of valve or damper) To be in a position allowing fluid to flow.
  14. (electricity, of a switch or circuit breaker) To be in a position preventing electricity from flowing.
  15. (sometimes business) Not fulfilled or resolved; incomplete.
    I've got open orders for as many containers of red durum as you can get me.
  16. Not settled or adjusted; not decided or determined; not closed or withdrawn from consideration.
    an open question
    to keep an offer or opportunity open
    Your account will remain open until we receive final settlement.
  17. (music, stringed instruments) Of a note, played without pressing the string against the fingerboard.
  18. (music) Of a note, played without closing any finger-hole, key or valve.
  19. Not of a quality to prevent communication, as by closing waterways, blocking roads, etc.; hence, not frosty or inclement; mild; used of the weather or the climate.
    an open winter
  20. (law, of correspondence) Written or sent with the intention that it may made public or referred to at any trial, rather than by way of confidential private negotiation for a settlement.
    You will observe that this is an open letter and we reserve the right to mention it to the judge should the matter come to trial.
  21. (phonetics) Uttered with a relatively wide opening of the articulating organs; said of vowels.
    • 1959, Anthony Burgess, Beds in the East (The Malayan Trilogy), published 1972, page 421:
      "Supposing somebody sees you, with all those flowers too? Supposing somebody writes him a letter? Ooooh!" (a pure round open Tamil O.)
  22. (phonetics) Uttered, as a consonant, with the oral passage simply narrowed without closure.
  23. (phonetics, of a syllable) That ends in a vowel; not having a coda.
  24. (computing, education) Made public, usable with a free licence and without proprietary components.
  25. (medicine) Resulting from an incision, puncture or any other process by which the skin no longer protects an internal part of the body.
  26. (computing, used before "code") Source code of a computer program that is not within the text of a macro being generated.
  27. (of a multi-word compound) Having component words separated by spaces, as opposed to being joined together or hyphenated; for example, time slot as opposed to timeslot or time-slot.
Synonyms edit
Antonyms edit
Hyponyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English openen, from Old English openian (to open), from Proto-West Germanic *opanōn, from Proto-Germanic *upanōną (to raise; lift; open), from Proto-Germanic *upanaz (open, adjective).

Cognate with Saterland Frisian eepenje (to open), West Frisian iepenje (to open), Dutch openen (to open), German öffnen (to open), Danish åbne (to open), Swedish öppna (to open), Norwegian Bokmål åpne (to open), Norwegian Nynorsk and Icelandic opna (to open). Related to English up.

Verb edit

open (third-person singular simple present opens, present participle opening, simple past and past participle opened)

  1. (transitive) To make something accessible or allow for passage by moving from a shut position.
    Turn the doorknob to open the door.
    • 1913, Joseph C[rosby] Lincoln, chapter VII, in Mr. Pratt’s Patients, New York, N.Y., London: D[aniel] Appleton and Company, →OCLC:
      I made a speaking trumpet of my hands and commenced to whoop “Ahoy!” and “Hello!” at the top of my lungs. [] The Colonel woke up, and, after asking what in brimstone was the matter, opened his mouth and roared “Hi!” and “Hello!” like the bull of Bashan.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 20, in The China Governess: A Mystery, London: Chatto & Windus, →OCLC:
      ‘No. I only opened the door a foot and put my head in. The street lamps shine into that room. I could see him. He was all right. Sleeping like a great grampus. Poor, poor chap.’
  2. (transitive) To make (an open space, etc.) by clearing away an obstacle or obstacles, in order to allow for passage, access, or visibility.
    He opened a path through the undergrowth.
    • 1996, Stephen King, Desperation:
      He had kept on recording everything then, when he had been sure he was going to die, and he went on recording everything now, when he was suddenly consumed with hate for the boy in his arms and overwhelmed by a desire to put something—his motorcycle key would do nicely — into the interfering little prayboy’s throat and open him like a can of beer.
  3. (transitive, intransitive, engineering, gas and liquid flow, of valve or damper) To move to a position allowing fluid to flow.
  4. (transitive, intransitive, electricity, of a switch, fuse or circuit breaker) To move to a position preventing electricity from flowing.
  5. (Manglish, Philippines) To turn on; to switch on.
    Open your webcam.Turn on your webcam.
    Open the fan please.Please switch on the fan.
    Open the lights please.Please turn on the lights.
  6. (transitive) To bring up, broach.
    I don't want to open that subject.
  7. (transitive) To enter upon, begin.
    to open a discussion
    to open fire upon an enemy
    to open trade, or correspondence
    to open a case in court, or a meeting
  8. (transitive) To spread; to expand into an open or loose position.
    to open a closed fist
    to open matted cotton by separating the fibres
    to open a map, book, or scroll
  9. (transitive) To make accessible to customers or clients.
    I will open the shop an hour early tomorrow.
    • 1934, White Unto Harvest in China: A Survey of the Lutheran United Mission, the China Mission of the N.L.C.A., 1890-1934[4], →OCLC, page 76:
      Suiping was opened as a main station in 1912 when Rev. H. M. Nesse arrived to take charge of the mission work.
  10. (transitive) To start (a campaign).
    Vermont will open elk hunting season next week.
  11. (intransitive) To become open.
    The door opened all by itself.
    • 1913, Joseph C[rosby] Lincoln, chapter I, in Mr. Pratt’s Patients, New York, N.Y., London: D[aniel] Appleton and Company, →OCLC:
      I stumbled along through the young pines and huckleberry bushes. Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path that, I cal'lated, might lead to the road I was hunting for. It twisted and turned, and, the first thing I knew, made a sudden bend around a bunch of bayberry scrub and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn.
  12. (intransitive) To begin conducting business.
    The shop opens at 9:00.
  13. (intransitive, cricket) To begin a side's innings as one of the first two batsmen.
  14. (intransitive, poker) To bet before any other player has in a particular betting round in a game of poker.
    After the first two players fold, Julie opens for $5.
  15. (transitive, intransitive, poker) To reveal one's hand.
    Jeff opens his hand revealing a straight flush.
  16. (computing, transitive, intransitive) To connect to a resource (a file, document, etc.) for viewing or editing.
  17. (transitive, nursing) To make (a bed) ready for a patient by folding back the bedcovers.
    • 2013, Susan C. deWit, Patricia A. Williams, Fundamental Concepts and Skills for Nursing, page 318:
      Follow agency policy, or open the bed by folding the top linens back.
  18. (obsolete) To disclose; to reveal; to interpret; to explain.
Usage notes edit
  • Due to the near-opposite meanings relating to fluid flow and electrical components, these usages are deprecated in safety-critical instructions, with the words to on or to off preferred, so instead of Open valve A; open switch B" use Turn valve A to ON; turn switch B to OFF.
Conjugation edit
Synonyms edit
Antonyms edit
Hyponyms edit
  • (to make accessible): crack (open a bit)
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 3 edit

From Middle English open (an aperture or opening), from the verb (see Etymology 2 above). In the sports sense, however, a shortening of “open competition”.

Noun edit

open (plural opens)

  1. (in the definite) Open or unobstructed space; an exposed location.
    I can't believe you left the lawnmower out in the open when you knew it was going to rain this afternoon!
    Wary of hunters, the fleeing deer kept well out of the open, dodging instead from thicket to thicket.
  2. (in the definite) Public knowledge or scrutiny; full view.
    We have got to bring this company's corrupt business practices into the open.
  3. (electronics) A defect in an electrical circuit preventing current from flowing.
    The electrician found the open in the circuit after a few minutes of testing.
  4. A sports event in which anybody can compete.
  5. The act of something being opened, such as an e-mail message.
    • 2016, Ian Dodson, The Art of Digital Marketing, page 144:
      The total number of opens from original, or unique, subscribers.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch openen, from Middle Dutch ōpenen, from Old Dutch opanon, from Proto-Germanic *upanōną.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

open (present open, present participle openende, past participle geopen)

  1. (transitive) to open

Related terms edit

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English open.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

open m (plural open or òpens)

  1. (sports) open

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Dutch ōpen, from Old Dutch opan, from Proto-West Germanic *opan, from Proto-Germanic *upanaz.

Adjective edit

open (comparative opener, superlative openst)

  1. open, not closed
    Antonyms: gesloten, dicht, toe
  2. open for business
    Antonyms: gesloten, dicht
  3. open, receptive
    Antonym: gesloten
Inflection edit
Inflection of open
uninflected open
inflected open
comparative opener
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial open opener het openst
het openste
indefinite m./f. sing. open opener openste
n. sing. open opener openste
plural open opener openste
definite open opener openste
partitive opens openers
Antonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Afrikaans: oop
  • Negerhollands: open, hopo
    • Virgin Islands Creole: hopo
  • ? Aukan: obo

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

open

  1. inflection of openen:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative

Anagrams edit

Finnish edit

Noun edit

open

  1. genitive singular of ope

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English open.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

open m (plural opens)

  1. open; open tournament

Further reading edit

Middle Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Old Dutch opan, from Proto-West Germanic *opan.

Adjective edit

ōpen

  1. open, not closed
  2. open, accessible
  3. freely accessible, public

Inflection edit

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Further reading edit

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old English open, from Proto-West Germanic *opan.

Adjective edit

open (comparative more open, superlative most open)

  1. open
    • 14th c. Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales. General Prologue: 9-11.
      And smale foweles maken melodye,
      That slepen al the nyght with open eye-
      (So priketh hem Nature in hir corages);
      And many little birds make melody
      That sleep through all the night with open eye
      (So Nature pricks them on to ramp and rage)

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse opinn, from Proto-Germanic *upanaz. Compare Faroese opin, Icelandic opinn, Swedish öppen, Danish åben, Dutch open, Low German apen, open, German offen, West Frisian iepen, English open.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

open (neuter ope or opent, definite singular and plural opne, comparative opnare, indefinite superlative opnast, definite superlative opnaste)

  1. open
    Kvifor er døra open?
    Why is the door open?

Usage notes edit

A common, but unofficial, feminine form is opa (“ei opa dør”, compare lita and inga). Up until 2012, opi was an optional official form, but was removed along with other forms like liti and ingi.

Related terms edit

References edit

Old English edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *opan, from Proto-Germanic *upanaz.

Originally a past participle of Proto-Germanic *ūpaną (to lift up, open). Related to Old English upp (up). Cognate with Old Frisian open, Old Saxon opan, Old High German offan, and Old Norse opinn.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

open

  1. open
    • 11th century, unknown translator, the Old English Apollonius of Tyre
      Þā ġeseah hē ānne nacodne cnapan ġeond þā strǣte rinnan. Sē wæs mid ele ġesmiered and mid sċīetan beġierded, and cleopode mid miċelre stefne and cwæþ, "Ġehīeraþ ġē ċeasterwaran, ġehīeraþ ġē ælþēodiġe, friġe and þēowe, æðele and unæðele: sē bæþstede is open!"
      Then he saw a naked boy running through the street. His body was smeared with oil and he was wearing a sheet around his waist, when he called out in a loud voice, "Attention citizens, attention foreigners, free and slave, noble and ignoble: the bathhouse is open!"

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Plautdietsch edit

Adjective edit

open

  1. open

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English open.

Noun edit

open n (plural openuri)

  1. open (sports event)

Declension edit

References edit

  • open in Academia Română, Micul dicționar academic, ediția a II-a, Bucharest: Univers Enciclopedic, 2010. →ISBN

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English open.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈopen/ [ˈo.pẽn]
  • Rhymes: -open
  • Syllabification: o‧pen

Noun edit

open m (plural opens or open)

  1. (sports) open