See also: Sip, SIP, -sip, síp, Síp, şip, šíp, and сип

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sippen, of uncertain origin. Compare with Low German sippen (to sip). Possibly from a variant of Middle English suppen (to drink, sip) (see sup) or perhaps from Old English sipian, sypian (to take in moisture, soak, macerate), from Proto-Germanic *sipōną (to drip, trickle), from Proto-Indo-European *seyb- (to pour out, trickle, leak out). Compare also Old High German supfen (to drink, sip), from Proto-Germanic *sūpaną (to sip, intake).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: sĭp, IPA(key): /sɪp/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪp

NounEdit

sip (plural sips)

  1. A small mouthful of drink

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

sip (third-person singular simple present sips, present participle sipping, simple past and past participle sipped)

  1. (transitive) To drink slowly, small mouthfuls at a time.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 5
      He held out to me a bowl of steaming broth, that filled the room with a savour sweeter, ten thousand times, to me than every rose and lily of the world; yet would not let me drink it at a gulp, but made me sip it with a spoon like any baby.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 5, in The China Governess[1]:
      A waiter brought his aperitif, which was a small scotch and soda, and as he sipped it gratefully he sighed.
    • 2013 August 3, “Revenge of the nerds”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8847:
      bright young things in jeans and T-shirts huddle around laptops, sipping lattes or munching on free food.
  2. (intransitive) To drink a small quantity.
    • 1697, Virgil, “The Second Book of the Æneis”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      [She] rais'd it to her mouth with sober grace; / Then, sipping, offered to the next in place.
  3. To taste the liquor of; to drink out of.
    • 1697, Virgil, “The Fourth Book of the Georgics”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      They skim the floods, and sip the purple flowers.
  4. (Scotland, US, dated) Alternative form of seep
  5. (figuratively) To consume slowly.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

sip

  1. (informal) yep

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sip (comparative sipper, superlative sipst)

  1. sad, subdued
    Synonyms: droevig, treurig

InflectionEdit

Inflection of sip
uninflected sip
inflected sippe
comparative sipper
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial sip sipper het sipst
het sipste
indefinite m./f. sing. sippe sippere sipste
n. sing. sip sipper sipste
plural sippe sippere sipste
definite sippe sippere sipste
partitive sips sippers

IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English safe, from Middle English sauf, safe, saf, saaf, from Old French sauf, saulf, salf (safe), from Latin salvus (whole, safe), from Proto-Indo-European *solh₂- (whole, every).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈsɪp]
  • Hyphenation: sip

AdjectiveEdit

sip

  1. (colloquial) safe.
    1. not in danger; out of harm's reach.
      Synonym: aman
    2. free from risk.
      Synonym: terjamin
    3. reliable.
      Synonyms: mantap, elok, baik, sempurna

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English zip.

NounEdit

sip f (genitive singular sipe, nominative plural sipeanna)

  1. zip, zipper, zip fastener

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
sip ship
after an, tsip
not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly a calque of English yep.

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

sip

  1. (informal, neologism) yep, yeah, uh-huh

See alsoEdit


Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English ship.

NounEdit

sip

  1. ship