Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /ɡɹɔɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪn

Etymology 1Edit

From earlier grine, from Middle English grinde, grynde, from Old English grynde (abyss) (perhaps also "depression, hollow"), probably related to Proto-Germanic *grunduz; see ground. Later altered under the influence of loin.

NounEdit

groin (plural groins)

  1. The crease or depression of the human body at the junction of the trunk and the thigh, together with the surrounding region.
    • 2011 October 15, Phil McNulty, “Liverpool 1 - 1 Man Utd”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      The Mexican levelled nine minutes from time after Steven Gerrard, making his first start since undergoing groin surgery in April, put Liverpool ahead with a 68th-minute free-kick.
  2. The area adjoining this fold or depression.
    He pulled a muscle in his groin.
  3. (architecture) The projecting solid angle formed by the meeting of two vaults
  4. (euphemistic) The genitals.
    He got kicked in the groin and was writhing in pain.
  5. (geometry) The surface formed by two such vaults.
Coordinate termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

groin (third-person singular simple present groins, present participle groining, simple past and past participle groined)

  1. To deliver a blow to the genitals of.
    In the scrum he somehow got groined.
    She groined him and ran to the car.
  2. (architecture) To build with groins.
  3. (literary) To hollow out, to excavate.
    'Down some profound dull tunnel, long since scooped / Through granites which titanic wars had groined.' (From Strange Meeting by Wilfred Owen).

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English groynen, from a mixture of Old French groignier, grougnier (from Latin grunniō) and Old English grunnian (from Proto-Germanic *grunnōną).

VerbEdit

groin (third-person singular simple present groins, present participle groining, simple past and past participle groined)

  1. To grunt; to growl; to snarl; to murmur.
    • Spenser
      bears that groined continually

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

groin (plural groins)

  1. Alternative spelling of groyne

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French groign, from Late Latin grunium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

groin m (plural groins)

  1. the snout of the pig

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

groin

  1. Alternative form of groyn