Open main menu
See also: loins, lóin, löin, and Łoin

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English loyne, from Old French loigne, from Latin lumbus, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (kidney, waist). Cognate with Old English lendenu, Dutch lende, German Lende, Swedish länd (haunch, loin), Proto-Slavic *lędvьja (Russian ля́двея (ljádveja)). See also lend.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

loin (plural loins)

  1. The part of the body (of humans and quadrupeds) at each side of the backbone, between the ribs and hips
  2. Any of several cuts of meat taken from this part of an animal

Usage notesEdit

The plural loins is used for a wider body region, or specifically as a euphemism for the pubic region

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

VerbEdit

loin

  1. First-person singular indicative past form of luoda.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Latin longē, from the adjective longus (long, far-off).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lwɛ̃/
  • (file)

AdverbEdit

loin

  1. Far, distant.
    L'église est loin de l'usine.
    The church is far from the factory.

Usage notesEdit

  • Loin is typically construed with de (of, from). Indeed, loin de may be thought of as a single compound preposition; for example, one says loin duquel (far from which), not *dont [] loin (from which [] far).

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

loin m

  1. genitive singular of lon