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See also: habitue and habitúe

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French habitué past participle of habituer (to frequent), from Late Latin habituare (to habituate), from habitus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

habitué (plural habitués)

  1. One who frequents a place. [from 1818]
    Synonyms: denizen, regular
    A month ago the new smoking ban turned thousands of bar-room habitués into reluctant exiles from their usual corner seat.
    • 1892, Walter Besant, chapter III, in The Ivory Gate: A Novel, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, [], OCLC 16832619:
      At half-past nine on this Saturday evening, the parlour of the Salutation Inn, High Holborn, contained most of its customary visitors. [] In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass.
  2. A devotee.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (mute h) IPA(key): /a.bi.tɥe/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

habitué m (feminine singular habituée, masculine plural habitués, feminine plural habituées)

  1. past participle of habituer

NounEdit

habitué m (plural habitués)

  1. a regular, a denizen (a frequent customer)

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French habitué.

NounEdit

habitué m or f (invariable)

  1. regular (customer)

SpanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French habitué.

NounEdit

habitué m (plural habitués)

  1. habitué; regular

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

habitué

  1. First-person singular (yo) preterite indicative form of habituar.