inhabitant

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English inhabitantes (n. plural) and inhabitaunt (adj.), from Old French inhabitant, from Latin inhabitāns, present participle of inhabitō (to inhabit), from in- (in) + habitō (to dwell) (frequentative of habeō (to hold), from Proto-Indo-European *ghabh- (to seize, take, hold, have).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈhæ.bɪ.tənt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: in‧hab‧i‧tant

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

inhabitant (plural inhabitants)

  1. Someone or thing who lives in a place.
    • 1899 Feb, Joseph Conrad, “The Heart of Darkness”, in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, page 216:
      I believed it in the same way one of you might believe there are inhabitants in the planet Mars. I knew once a Scotch sailmaker who was certain, dead sure, there were people in Mars.
    • 2007 April, Grundvig, Julie, “TAIWAN”, in The Asia Book: A Journey Through Every Country in the Continent[1], →ISBN, OCLC 82672255, page 103, column 2:
      About 98 per cent of Taiwan's inhabitants are Han Chinese, a diverse mix of ethnic and linguistic groups, including Hakka, Cantonese and Fujianese, who came from China's southern coast. Taiwan's other two per cent are from one of the nine indigenous tribes, which are scattered throughout the island but largely concentrated along the east coast and in the Central Mountain Range.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

inhabitant (not comparable)

  1. resident

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

inhabitant

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of inhabitō

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

inhabitant m (oblique plural inhabitanz or inhabitantz, nominative singular inhabitanz or inhabitantz, nominative plural inhabitant)

  1. inhabitant

DescendantsEdit

  • English: inhabitant

ReferencesEdit