Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Late 16th century, from earlier heyda (1520s), as exclamation – compare hey, hei. Sense “period of success, vigor” from 1751, which respelt as heyday based on unrelated day (as “period of time”) – compare day in the sun.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

heyday ‎(plural heydays)

  1. A period of success, popularity, or power; prime.
    The early twentieth century was the heyday of the steam locomotive.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

heyday

  1. A lively greeting.
    • 1798, Jane Austen - Northanger Abbey:
      "Heyday, Miss Morland!" said he. "What is the meaning of this? I thought you and I were to dance together."
  2. (obsolete) An expression of frolic and exultation, and sometimes of wonder.
    • 1600, Ben Jonson - Cynthia's Revels :
      "Come follow me, my wags, and say, as I say. There's no riches but in rags; hey day, hey day, &c."

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ heyday” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).