horchata

EnglishEdit

 
Jar of horchata (white)

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish horchata, from Valencian orxata (possibly via a Mozarabic source), from Vulgar Latin *hordeata ((drink, food) made of barley), from hordeum (barley). Alternatively the Spanish derived from Italian orzata.

Cognate to English and French orgeat (almond syrup), Italian orzata, and Surinamese Dutch orgeade.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

horchata (countable and uncountable, plural horchatas)

  1. A sweet beverage variously made with rice, chufa or morro seeds, water, sugar, and cinnamon, and sometimes with milk.
    • 2011, Miguel-Angel Galindo, Domingo Ribeiro, Women’s Entrepreneurship and Economics: New Perspectives, Practices, and Policies, Springer Science & Business Media (→ISBN), page 66:
      Manufacturers from the villages surrounding the capital of the region came each day to the city of Valencia with carts pulled by donkeys to sell fresh horchata, tiger nuts and barley water.

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lobscouse & Spotted Dog: Which It's a Gastronomic Companion to the Aubrey/Maturin Novels : Grossman, Anne Chotzinoff; Thomas, Lisa Grossman →ISBN

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly from Valencian orxata (possibly via a Mozarabic source[1]), from Vulgar Latin *hordeata, from Latin hordeum (barley). However, the word was attested relatively late in Catalan as well (17th-18th century), so this is uncertain.[2] Alternatively, it may be of Italian origin; cf. orzata (barley water).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /orˈt͡ʃata/, [orˈt͡ʃat̪a]

NounEdit

horchata f (plural horchatas)

  1. horchata (sweet beverage)

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ horchata” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.
  2. ^ Joan Corominas (1987) Breve diccionario etimológico de la lengua castellana[1]