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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hortātīvus, from hortor (I exhort).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hortative (comparative more hortative, superlative most hortative)

  1. (comparable) Urging, exhorting, or encouraging.
    • 1854, "The Preaching Required by the Times" (Editorial), The National Magazine, New York, vol. 4, no. 1 (Jan.), pp. 79-80.
      The ministration of these oracles from the pulpit is to be reformed from any of its factitious peculiarities, and made again what it was among the apostles and their immediate successors—earnest, simple, powerful address—hortative talk, if we may so call it.
  2. (grammar, not comparable) Of a mood or class of imperative subjunctive moods of a verb for giving strong encouragement.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

hortative (plural hortatives)

  1. (grammar) A mood or class of imperative subjunctive moods of a verb for giving strong encouragement.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit