English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French huque, from Latin huca. See Dutch huik (sleeveless cape).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /h(j)uːk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːk

Noun edit

huke (plural hukes)

  1. (historical) An outer garment (robe or cloak) worn by men and women in Europe in the Middle Ages, either as civilian clothing or over armor.
    • 1631, Francis [Bacon], “(please specify |century=I to X)”, in Sylua Syluarum: Or A Naturall Historie. In Ten Centuries. [], 3rd edition, London: [] William Rawley; [p]rinted by J[ohn] H[aviland] for William Lee [], →OCLC:
      there came one that seemed to be a messenger , in a rich huke
    • 1930, “The real Joan of Arc: a manly maid - her appearance, her dress, her armour”, in The Illustrated London News:
      Her only extravagances were fine accoutrements, gorgeous hukes, and mighty war-horses.
    • 1980, A. Ernestine Jones, The Trial of Joan of Arc:
      Judging from the surviving documents it would appear that Charles VII did nothing at all about Joan of Arc [...] but [she] also swore that she herself was often visited by God, dressed in a white robe with a scarlet huke over it.
    • 2015 March 12, Phyllis G. Tortora, Sara B. Marcketti, Survey of Historic Costume, Bloomsbury Publishing USA, →ISBN, page 173:
      [] but after this date “white” armor, or highly polished metal armor, was rarely covered except by a tabard or huke []

Translations edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Basque edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): (Navarro-Lapurdian) /huke/ [hu.ke]
  • IPA(key): (Southern) /uke/ [u.ke]
  • Rhymes: -uke
  • Hyphenation: hu‧ke

Verb edit

huke

  1. Informal second-person singular (hik), taking third-person singular (hura) as direct object, hypothetic consequential indicative form of izan.

Usage notes edit

Linguistically, this verb form can be seen as belonging to the reconstructed citation form edun instead of izan.

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology 1 edit

From the noun huk.

Verb edit

huke (imperative huk, present tense huker, passive hukes, simple past huka or huket or hukte, past participle huka or huket or hukt, present participle hukende)

  1. to hook, to pull in with a hook
  2. to grab, snatch
  3. huke tak (i) - to catch hold (of)

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Norse húka and huk.

Verb edit

huke (imperative huk, present tense huker, passive hukes, simple past huka or huket or hukte, past participle huka or huket or hukt, present participle hukende)

  1. (reflexive) to crouch, squat

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology 1 edit

From the noun huk.

Verb edit

huke (present tense hukar, past tense huka, past participle huka, passive infinitive hukast, present participle hukande, imperative huke/huk)

  1. to hook, to pull in with a hook
  2. to grab, snatch
  3. huke tak (i) - to catch hold (of)

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Norse húka and huk.

Verb edit

huke (present tense huker, past tense hukte, past participle hukt, passive infinitive hukast, present participle hukande, imperative huk)

  1. (reflexive) to crouch, squat

References edit