EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French huque, from Latin huca. Compare huik.

NounEdit

huke (plural hukes)

  1. (obsolete) An outer garment worn in Europe in the Middle Ages.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for huke in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From the noun huk

VerbEdit

huke (imperative huk, present tense huker, passive hukes, simple past huka or huket or hukte, past participle huka or huket or hukt, present participle hukende)

  1. to hook, to pull in with a hook
  2. to grab, snatch
  3. huke tak (i) - to catch hold (of)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse húka and huk

VerbEdit

huke (imperative huk, present tense huker, passive hukes, simple past huka or huket or hukte, past participle huka or huket or hukt, present participle hukende)

(reflexive) to crouch, squat

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From the noun huk

VerbEdit

huke (present tense hukar, past tense huka, past participle huka, passive infinitive hukast, present participle hukande, imperative huk/huke)

  1. to hook, to pull in with a hook
  2. to grab, snatch
  3. huke tak (i) - to catch hold (of)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse húka and huk

VerbEdit

huke (present tense huker, past tense hukte, past participle hukt, passive infinitive hukast, present participle hukande, imperative huk)

(reflexive) to crouch, squat

ReferencesEdit