i U+0069, i
LATIN SMALL LETTER I
h
[U+0068]
Basic Latin j
[U+006A]
U+2071, ⁱ
SUPERSCRIPT LATIN SMALL LETTER I
[unassigned: U+2072–U+2073]

[U+2070]
Superscripts and Subscripts
[U+2074]
U+2170, ⅰ
SMALL ROMAN NUMERAL ONE

[U+216F]
Number Forms
[U+2171]
U+FF49, i
FULLWIDTH LATIN SMALL LETTER I

[U+FF48]
Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms
[U+FF4A]

Translingual edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1 edit

Lower case variation of upper case I, from Ancient Greek letter Ι (I, Iota).

Letter edit

i (upper case I)

  1. The ninth letter of the basic modern Latin alphabet.

i (upper case İ)

  1. In the Turkish alphabet and its descendants, the lower-case form of dotted capital İ, which contrasts with ı as the lower-case form of dotless capital I.

See also edit

Derived symbols

Similar and related symbols

Etymology 2 edit

  • (mathematics, imaginary number): abbreviation of imaginary
  • (engineering, electric current): abbreviation of French intensité du courant first used by M. André-Marie Ampère
  • (computer programming, generic index): abbreviation of index

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Symbol edit

i

  1. (mathematics, often in italics or bold) The imaginary unit; a fixed square root of -1. Graphically,   is shown on the vertical (y-axis) plane.
    Synonym: j
    a+bi with a is real part and b is imaginary part
  2. (engineering, often in bold) The current flow in an electric circuit, frequently measured in amperes.
    v=ir (Ohm's Law)
  3. (mathematics, programming) A common variable name representing a generic index, especially in loops.
    Synonym: j
  4. (IPA, romanization) a close front unrounded vowel.
    (IPA, superscript ⟨ⁱ⟩) [i]-coloring, an [i] on- or off-glide (diphthong), or a weak, fleeting, epenthetic or echo [i].
  5. (international standards) transliterates Indic (or equivalent).
  6. (financial mathematics) annual effective interest rate

Etymology 3 edit

Lower case form of upper case Roman numeral I, apparently derived from the shape of a notch scored across a tally stick.

Alternative forms edit

Numeral edit

i (lower case Roman numeral, upper case I)

  1. cardinal number one.
  2. (music) minor tonic triad

See also edit

Gallery edit

See also edit

Other representations of I:

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin i, minuscule of I.

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I, plural is or i's)

  1. The ninth letter of the English alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.
Usage notes edit

The English letter i represents many different sounds, often the diphthong /aɪ/ (from Middle English /iː/), as in the pronoun I, or /ɪ/ as in bit.

See also edit

Number edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The ordinal number ninth, derived from this letter of the English alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.

Noun edit

i (plural ies)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter I.
    • the position of an i-dot (the dot of an i)
    • i-mutation, i-umlaut
Alternative forms edit

Derived terms edit

Translations edit
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old English .

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

i

  1. (nonstandard) Alternative letter-case form of I
    • 1762, Benj[amin] Stillingfleet, Miscellaneous Tracts Relating to Natural History, Husbandry, and Physick. To Which Is Added the Calendar of Flora., 2nd edition, London: [] R. and J. Dodsley, []; S. Baker, []; and T. Payne, [], pages 30 and 32:
      Here follow ſome few lines in the original, which not underſtanding i have omitted. [] Laſtly that amidſt ſo many viciſſitudes of fortune, to which I have been expoſed, amongſt all the goods, i ſay, and evils, the joyfull and gloomy, the pleaſing, and diſagreeable circumſtances of life, thou endowedſt me with an equal, conſtant, manly, and ſuperior ſpirit on every occaſion.
Usage notes edit
  • Also used in instant messaging due to limitations of entering capitals on a mobile phone's keypad.
  • Sometimes to indicate informality, primarily in typed media

Etymology 3 edit

Abbreviations.

  1. (stenoscript) a word-initial letter ⟨i⟩
  2. (stenoscript) the long vowel /aɪ/ at the end of a word, or before a final consonant that is not /dʒ, v, z/. (Note: the final consonant is not written.)
  3. (stenoscript) the words if, is, it, its

Acehnese edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

i

  1. water

References edit

Adangme edit

Pronoun edit

i

  1. I
    I suɔ mo.I love you.

Albanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The thirteenth letter of the Albanian alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Preposition edit

i m

  1. masculine singular preposition
  2. of (+ dative)
    Fisi i Malësorëve.The tribe of Highlanders.
    Fisi i Malësorëvet.The tribe of the Highlanders.

Article edit

i m

  1. masculine singular nominative adjectival article
  2. the
    Shkurt. I shkurt. I shkurti.Short. Short one. The short one. or Short. Shorty. The shorty.
    Madh. I madhi zot. / Zoti i madh.Great. The great god.

See also edit

See Appendix:Albanian adjectival articles for other forms.

Related terms edit

Alemannic German edit

Pronoun edit

i (unstressed)

  1. I (first-person singular pronoun)
    Synonym: (stressed) ich

Ama edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

i

  1. tooth

Anambé edit

Noun edit

i

  1. water

Further reading edit

  • Paul Ehrenreich, Materialien zur Sprachenkunde Brasiliens IV: Vocabulare der Guajajara und Anambē (Para) (1895) (i)
  • Wolf Dietrich, Correspondências fonológicas e lexicais entre Karitiána (Arikém, Tupí) e Tupí-Guaraní (y)

Araweté edit

Noun edit

i

  1. water

References edit

Aruá edit

Noun edit

i

  1. water

References edit

Azerbaijani edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case İ)

  1. The fourteenth letter of the Azerbaijani alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Bambara edit

Pronoun edit

í

  1. thou, you (singular)

Basque edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The ninth letter of the Basque alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Noun edit

i (indeclinable)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter I.

See also edit

Bavarian edit

Alternative forms edit

  • y (Niederbayerisch)

Etymology edit

From Middle High German ich, from Old High German ih, from Proto-West Germanic *ik. Cognates include German ich and Yiddishאיך(ikh).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /i(ː)/, (stressed) [iː], (unstressed) [ɪ], [e]

Pronoun edit

i

  1. I
    • 2013, “I halts nit aus [I can't endure it]”, performed by Hannah:
      I halts nit aus, des Scheißgefühl, i kann di doch liaben wann und wo i will!
      I can't endure this shitty feeling, I can, after all, love you when and where I want!

See also edit

Bislama edit

Particle edit

i

  1. Separates the subject of a sentence from the predicate, used when the subject is a pronoun or a noun

Borôro edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

i

  1. tree

Bourguignon edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French je, from Vulgar Latin eo, from Latin ego. Near cognates include Franc-Comtois i and standard French je.

Pronoun edit

i

  1. I
    I panse qu'i seus maulaide.I think that I'm sick.
    I t'aime.I love you.
  2. we

Related terms edit

See Appendix:Bourguignon personal pronouns.

Cameroon Pidgin edit

Alternative forms edit

  • he, she, it (in higher registers closer to English with corresponding gender distinction)
  • il, ele (Camfranglais with Romance gender distinction)

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

i

  1. 3rd person singular subject personal pronoun

See also edit

Catalan edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

  This entry needs an audio pronunciation. If you are a native speaker with a microphone, please record this word. The recorded pronunciation will appear here when it's ready.

Noun edit

i f (plural is)

  1. the Latin letter I (lowercase i)
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Catalan e.

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

i

  1. and; used to connect two similar words, phrases, sentences, etc.; as well as; together with; in addition to
    Hi ha moltes colomes i teuladins.There are many pigeons and sparrows.
    Ella escriu els articles i ell els il·lustra amb els seus dibuixos.She writes the articles and he illustrates them with his drawings.
Alternative forms edit
  • y (obsolete)
  • e (medieval, obsolete)

References edit

Cemuhî edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Oceanic *kutu.

Noun edit

i

  1. louse

References edit

  • Jim Hollyman,K. J. Hollyman, Études sur les langues du Nord de la Nouvelle-Calédonie, page 52, 1999

Chuukese edit

Pronoun edit

i

  1. him
  2. her
  3. it

Related terms edit

Cimbrian edit

Alternative forms edit

  • ich (Sette Comuni)

Etymology edit

From Middle High German ich, from Old High German ih, from Proto-West Germanic *ik. Cognate with German ich, English I.

Pronoun edit

i

  1. (Luserna) I
    I hån an pruadar un a sbestar.I have a brother and a sister.

Inflection edit

Personal pronouns
singular plural
1st person i biar
2nd person du iar
3rd person er, si, 'z se

References edit

Classical Nahuatl edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

ī

  1. (transitive) to drink

Cornish edit

Pronoun edit

i

  1. they

Corsican edit

Etymology edit

From the earlier li. Compare Italian i (the) and Romanian îi (them).

Article edit

i m pl (masculine singular u, feminine singular a, feminine plural e)

  1. the (masculine plural)

Usage notes edit

  • Before a vowel, i turns into l'.

Pronoun edit

i m pl

  1. them (direct object)

Usage notes edit

  • Before a vowel, i turns into l'.

See also edit

References edit

Czech edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Slavic *i.

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

i

  1. and (also), and even
    Synonyms: (Moravian) aj, (Moravian) aji
  2. even (implying an extreme example, used at the beginning of sentences)
    Synonyms: (Moravian) aj, (Moravian) aji
    I slepá veverka někdy najde ořech.Even a blind squirrel finds an acorn sometimes.

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • i in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • i in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dalmatian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin illī, nominative masculine plural of ille. Compare Italian i, gli.

Article edit

i

  1. the; masculine plural definite article

Related terms edit

Dama (Sierra Leone) edit

Etymology edit

Likely cognate with Vai [script needed] (i, you).

Pronoun edit

i

  1. The meaning of this term is uncertain. Possibilities include:
    1. I (first-person singular personal pronoun)
    2. you (second-person singular person pronoun)

Usage notes edit

The rememberer who glossed this word did so as "I", but Dalby proposes that this is an error, based on the Vai pronouns.

References edit

  • Dalby, T. D. P. (1963), “The extinct language of Dama”, in Sierra Leone Language Review, volume 2, Freetown: Fourah Bay College, pages 50–54

Danish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse í, from Proto-Germanic *in, from Proto-Indo-European *en.

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

i

  1. in, inside
  2. Indicates exponentiation.
    Tre i femte.Three to the power of five. (short for tre i femte potens, three in fifth power). [note that the exponent is in the ordinal form]
  3. for (some duration)
    Jeg har boet her i tre år.I have lived here for three years.
  4. Used to indicate a past time or period when something took place.
    Han fyldte seks år i mandags.He turned six years old on Monday.
  5. Used to indicate regular presence in a location.
    Pigen går i gymnasiet og er 17 årThe girl goes to high school and is 17 years old.
  6. Used in conjunction with time to indicate a number of minutes before a full hour.
    Fem minutter i tolv.Five minutes to twelve.
  7. Used when indicating that something is happening or repeated a number of times within each time period .
    Tre gange i timen.Three times a day
  8. Indicates affiliation with a profession.
    Professor i fysikProfessor of physics

Drehu edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

i

  1. fish

References edit

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The ninth letter of the Dutch alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Elfdalian edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse í, from Proto-Germanic *in. Cognate with Swedish i.

Preposition edit

i

  1. in

Emilian edit

Alternative forms edit

  • j- (before vowels)
  • -i (after consonant)
  • -j (after vowels)

Etymology edit

From Latin illī (they) (nominative plural of ille).

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

i (personal)

  1. (nominative case, masculine) they
  2. (accusative case, masculine) them

Related terms edit

Esperanto edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The twelfth letter of the Esperanto alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Noun edit

i (accusative singular i-on, plural i-oj, accusative plural i-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter I.

See also edit

Estonian edit

 
Estonian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia et

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The ninth letter of the Estonian alphabet, called ii and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Extremaduran edit

Conjunction edit

i

  1. and

Fala edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese e.

Conjunction edit

i

  1. and (expressing two elements to be taken together)

Quotations edit

For more quotations using this term, see Citations:i.

Faroese edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (upper case I)

  1. The tenth letter of the Faroese alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Noun edit

i n (genitive singular is, plural i)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter I.

Declension edit

Declension of i
n4 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative i iið i iini
accusative i iið i iini
dative i, ii inum ium iunum
genitive is isins ia ianna

See also edit

Finnish edit

Etymology edit

The Finnish orthography using the Latin script was based on those of Swedish, German and Latin, and was first used in the mid-16th century. No earlier script is known. See the Wikipedia article on Finnish for more information, and i for information on the development of the glyph itself.

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The ninth letter of the Finnish alphabet, called ii and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Foi edit

Noun edit

i

  1. eye
  2. seventeen
  3. twenty-one

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

i m (plural is)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter I.

Derived terms edit

Friulian edit

Friulian Definite Articles
singular plural
masculine il
l'
i
feminine  la
l'
lis

Etymology edit

From Latin illi.

Article edit

i m pl (singular il)

  1. the

Pronoun edit

i (third person masculine/ feminine indirect object)

  1. to him
  2. to her

See also edit

Fula edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. A letter of the Fula alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Usage notes edit

See also edit

Galician edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The ninth letter of the Galician alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Noun edit

i m (plural is)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter I.

Etymology 2 edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Particle edit

i

  1. an antihiatical particle that, due to sandhi, can precede a word which begins with a vowel sound after a word which ends with vowel sound; now rarely represented in written language
    • 1594, anonymous author, Entremés dos pastores:
      Ay Jan cata non te enfermes, nen sentencies con malicia, cata que a yalma perdes.
      Oh, Xan, watch out, don't get sick, nor sentence with meanness, watch out that your soul you're loosing

Gothic edit

Romanization edit

i

  1. Romanization of 𐌹

Guinea-Bissau Creole edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Portuguese ele.

Pronoun edit

i

  1. he, she (third person singular).

Etymology 2 edit

From Portuguese e. Cognate with Spanish y.

Conjunction edit

i

  1. and

Haitian Creole edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

i

  1. (Okap dialect) he, she, it

Hawaiian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Polynesian *i.

Pronunciation edit

Particle edit

i

  1. used to mark the following (noun or noun phrase) as a direct object
    Ua ʻai ka pōpoki i ka ʻiole.The cat ate the mouse.
  2. used to indicate past tense (precedes verb)
    I hana au.I worked.
  3. used to indicate perfect participle (precedes verb)
    i haʻalelehaving left, who had left

Preposition edit

i

  1. in, at
  2. (indicating destination) to

See also edit

Hokkien edit

For pronunciation and definitions of i – see (“he, him; she, her; it”).
(This term is the pe̍h-ōe-jī form of ).

Hungarian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (phoneme): IPA: [ˈi]
  • (letter name): IPA: [ˈi]

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The fifteenth letter of the Hungarian alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.

Declension edit

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative i i-k
accusative i-t i-ket
dative i-nek i-knek
instrumental i-vel i-kkel
causal-final i-ért i-kért
translative i-vé i-kké
terminative i-ig i-kig
essive-formal i-ként i-kként
essive-modal
inessive i-ben i-kben
superessive i-n i-ken
adessive i-nél i-knél
illative i-be i-kbe
sublative i-re i-kre
allative i-hez i-khez
elative i-ből i-kből
delative i-ről i-kről
ablative i-től i-ktől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
i-é i-ké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
i-éi i-kéi
Possessive forms of i
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. i-m i-im
2nd person sing. i-d i-id
3rd person sing. i-je i-i
1st person plural i-nk i-ink
2nd person plural i-tek i-itek
3rd person plural i-jük i-ik

See also edit

Further reading edit

  • i in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Icelandic edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (letter name) IPA(key): /ɪː/

Letter edit

i (upper case I)

  1. The eleventh letter of the Icelandic alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Ido edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (context pronunciation, letter name) IPA(key): /i/

Letter edit

i (upper case I)

  1. The ninth letter of the Ido alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Igbo edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The twelfth letter of the Igbo alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Etymology 2 edit

Alternative forms edit

  • (retracted tongue position)

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

i (dependent form, independent form gị)

  1. (personal) you (singular)
    Kedụ ka i mere?
    How are you?
See also edit

Indonesian edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The ninth letter of the Indonesian alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Ingrian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Russian и (i).

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

i

  1. and
    Miä läkkään ižoraks i soomeks.I speak Ingrian and Finnish.
    • 1936, N. A. Iljin and V. I. Junus, Bukvari iƶoroin șkouluja vart, Leningrad: Riikin Ucebno-pedagogiceskoi Izdateljstva, page 19:
      Repo i kana.
      A fox and a hen.

Synonyms edit

Particle edit

i

  1. also, as well, too
    Mut, miä läkkään i viroks.But, I speak Estonian, too.
    • 1885, “Sprachproben: Der goldene Vogel”, in Volmari Porkka, editor, Ueber den Ingrischen Dialekt mit Berücksichtigung der übrigen finnisch-ingermanländischen Dialekte:
      Mäni da i heittiis makkaamaa, ja makkais taas hoomuksee nasse.
      He went and threw himself to sleep, too, and he slept up till the morning again.
      (Note: The spelling has been normalised in accordance with the literary Ingrian language.)
    • 1936, V. I. Junus, Iƶoran Keelen Grammatikka[1], Leningrad: Riikin Ucebno-pedagogiceskoi Izdateljstva, page 3:
      Iƶorat laatiit kansan, kumpa keelen poolest kuuluu läns-fenniläisiin kansoin gruppaa ja sil viisii i iƶoroin keeli kuuluu läns-fenniläisee keelisisteemaa.
      The Ingrians make up a people, that based on their language belongs to the group of Finnic peoples and as such the language of Ingrians also belongs to the Finnic language family.

Synonyms edit

References edit

  • Ruben E. Nirvi (1971) Inkeroismurteiden Sanakirja, Helsinki: Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura, page 86
  • Olga I. Konkova; Nikita A. Dyachkov (2014) Inkeroin Keel: Пособие по Ижорскому Языку[2], →ISBN, page 79

Irish edit

Alternative forms edit

  • in (used before vowels in place of eclipsis; also used before bhur (your, pl), dhá (two), titles of books, films, and the like, and foreign words that resist mutation)

Etymology edit

From Old Irish i, from Proto-Celtic *eni (compare Welsh yn), from Proto-Indo-European *en (compare English in, Latin in, Ancient Greek ἐν (en)).

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

i (plus dative, triggers eclipsis, before the definite article s-, ins)

  1. in

Inflection edit

Derived terms edit

See also Category:Irish phrasal verbs with particle (i)

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
i n-i hi not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

Italian edit

Etymology 1 edit

Reduced form of gli, from earlier li, from Latin illī (nominative plural and dative singular of ille).[1]

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

Italian Definite Articles
singular plural
masculine il
lo/l'
i
gli
feminine  la/l' le

i m pl (singular il)

  1. the
Usage notes edit
  • i is used before masculine plural words beginning with a single consonant other than x or z, or the plural noun dei; gli is used before masculine plural words beginning with a vowel, x, z, gn, or multiple consonants including pn, ps, and s+consonant, and before the plural noun dei.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin ī (the name of the letter I).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈi/*
  • Rhymes: -i
  • Hyphenation: ì

Letter edit

i f or m (invariable, lower case, upper case I)

  1. The ninth letter of the Italian alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.

Noun edit

i f (invariable)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter I.; i
Derived terms edit
See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ Patota, Giuseppe (2002) Lineamenti di grammatica storica dell'italiano (in Italian), Bologna: il Mulino, →ISBN, page 126

Further reading edit

Italiot Greek edit

Etymology edit

From Ancient Greek ()

Article edit

i

  1. feminine nominative singular of o

Iu Mien edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Hmong-Mien *ʔu̯i (two). Cognate with White Hmong ob and Western Xiangxi Miao [Fenghuang] oub.

Numeral edit

i

  1. two

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

i

  1. Rōmaji transcription of
  2. Rōmaji transcription of

Kabuverdianu edit

Etymology edit

From Spanish y and Portuguese e.

Conjunction edit

i

  1. and

Kabyle edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Preposition edit

i

  1. to, for

Kashubian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈi/
  • Syllabification: i

Etymology 1 edit

The Kashubian orthography is based on the Latin alphabet. No earlier script is known. See the Kashubian alphabet article on Wikipedia for more, and i for development of the glyph itself.

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The thirteenth letter of the Kashubian alphabet, written in the Latin script.
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *i.

Conjunction edit

i

  1. coordinating conjunction; and

Alternative forms edit

Further reading edit

  • Eùgeniusz Gòłąbk (2011), “i”, in Słownik Polsko-Kaszubski / Słowôrz Pòlskò-Kaszëbsczi, volume 1, page 515
  • i”, in Internetowi Słowôrz Kaszëbsczégò Jãzëka [Internet Dictionary of the Kashubian Language], Fundacja Kaszuby, 2022

Ladin edit

Article edit

i m (plural)

  1. the

See also edit

Ladino edit

Etymology edit

From Old Spanish é or e, from Latin et.

Conjunction edit

i (Latin spelling, Hebrew spellingאי⁩)

  1. and
  2. too

Latgalian edit

Etymology edit

Shortened from Proto-Balto-Slavic *ir, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂r̥- (thus), preserved as such in Latvian ir and Lithuanian ir. Not related to Proto-Slavic *i and its descendants.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈi]
  • Hyphenation: i

Conjunction edit

i

  1. and

Particle edit

i

  1. too, also

References edit

  • Nicole Nau (2011) A short grammar of Latgalian, München: LINCOM GmbH, →ISBN

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

ī f (indeclinable)

  1. The name of the letter I.
Coordinate terms edit

References edit

  • i in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • i in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), part III: “Summary of the Ancient Evidence”, page 32: "Clearly there is no question or doubt about the names of the vowels A, E, I, O, U. They are simply long A, long E, etc. (ā, ē, ī, ō, ū). Nor is there any uncertainty with respect to the six mutes B, C, D, G, P, T. Their names are bē, cē, dē, gē, pē, tē (each with a long E). Or about H, K, and Q: they are hā, kā, kū—each, again, with a long vowel sound."

Etymology 2 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb edit

ī

  1. go! walk!; second-person singular active imperative of
    I intro iam nunc.Now then, go in.

Latvian edit

 
Latvian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia lv
 
I

Etymology edit

Proposed in 1908 as part of the new Latvian spelling by the scientific commission headed by K. Mīlenbahs, which was accepted and began to be taught in schools in 1909. Prior to that, Latvian had been written in German Fraktur, and sporadically in Cyrillic.

Pronunciation 1 edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The thirteenth letter of the Latvian alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.
See also edit

Pronunciation 2 edit

  • IPA: [i]

Noun edit

i m (invariable)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter I.
See also edit

Liangmai Naga edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

i (dual anai, plural aliu)

  1. I

Ligurian edit

Ligurian Definite Articles
singular plural
masculine o i
feminine  a e

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

i m pl (singular o)

  1. the

Lithuanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (upper case I)

  1. The thirteenth letter of the Lithuanian alphabet, called i trumpoji and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Livonian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (phoneme) IPA: /i/

Letter edit

i (upper case I)

  1. The thirteenth letter of the Livonian alphabet, written in the Latin script.


Lower Grand Valley Dani edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

i

  1. water

References edit

  • H. Myron Bromley, A Grammar of Lower Grand Valley Dani (1981)
  • H. Myron Bromley, The Phonology of Lower Grand Valley Dani (2013)
  • The Papuan Languages of New Guinea (1986, →ISBN

Lower Sorbian edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (upper case I)

  1. The thirteenth letter of the Lower Sorbian alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.
  2. The name of the Latin-script letter i.

Conjunction edit

i

  1. (archaic) and

Interjection edit

i!

  1. ew!, ick!

See also edit

Further reading edit

  • Muka, Arnošt (1921, 1928), “i”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • Starosta, Manfred (1999), “i”, in Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch (in German), Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag

Lule Sami edit

Verb edit

i

  1. second-person singular present of ij

Lushootseed edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (phoneme) IPA(key): /i/, /eɪ/

Letter edit

i

  1. The fifteenth letter of the Lushootseed alphabet, pronounced as a non-low front unrounded vowel.

Makasar edit

Article edit

i (Lontara spelling ᨕᨗ)

  1. article for personal names and pronouns

Malay edit

Letter edit

i

  1. The ninth letter of the Malay alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Maltese edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɪ/ (short phoneme)
  • IPA(key): /iː/ (long phoneme)
  • IPA(key): /ɪː/ (long phoneme before the letters , ħ, h, q; merges with ie)
  • IPA(key): /ɛj/, /aj/ (after ; variation is regional and idiolectal)

Letter edit

i (upper case I)

  1. The twelfth letter of the Maltese alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Mandinka edit

Pronoun edit

i

  1. you (personal pronoun)
    as i busahe/she struck you.

See also edit

Maori edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Polynesian *i.

Particle edit

i

  1. from
  2. past-tense verbal particle
  3. particle indicating the direct object of a transitive sentence
  4. past-tense particle indicating location

Masurian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Polish i.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈi]
  • Syllabification: i

Conjunction edit

i

  1. and
  2. whereas

Particle edit

i

  1. begins a statement
  2. even

Further reading edit

  • Zofia Stamirowska (1987-2021), “i”, in Anna Basara, editor, Słownik gwar Ostródzkiego, Warmii i Mazur, volume 3, Zakład Narodowy im. Ossolińskich Wydawnictwo Polskiej Akademii Nauk, →ISBN, page 30

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Preposition edit

i

  1. Alternative form of in (in)

Etymology 2 edit

Pronoun edit

i

  1. Alternative form of I (I)

Etymology 3 edit

Pronoun edit

i

  1. Alternative form of he (they)

Middle Low German edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

i m

  1. Alternative form of .

Mirandese edit

Etymology edit

From Latin et.

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

i

  1. and

Mòcheno edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German ich, from Old High German ih, from Proto-West Germanic *ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek. Cognate with German ich, English I.

Pronoun edit

i (dative mer)

  1. I

Inflection edit

Personal pronouns
singular plural
1st person i biar
2nd person du ir
3rd person er, si, s sei

References edit

Mondé edit

Noun edit

i

  1. water

References edit

Murui Huitoto edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈi]
  • Hyphenation: i

Root edit

i

  1. this, that (anaphoric, aspecific)

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Katarzyna Izabela Wojtylak (2017) A grammar of Murui (Bue): a Witotoan language of Northwest Amazonia.[3], Townsville: James Cook University press (PhD thesis), page 161

Navajo edit

Letter edit

i (upper case I)

  1. The thirteenth letter of the Navajo alphabet, written in the Latin script:
    i = /ɪ˨/
    į = /ɪ̃˨/
    í = /ɪ˥/
    į́ = /ɪ̃˥/
    ii = /iː˨˨/
    įį = /ĩː˨˨/
    íi = /iː˥˨/
    į́į = /ĩː˥˨/
    ií = /iː˨˥/
    įį́ = /ĩː˨˥/
    íí = /iː˥˥/
    į́į́ = /ĩː˥˥/

Neapolitan edit

Etymology 1 edit

Verb edit

i

  1. Alternative spelling of ire (to go)

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin ego.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

i

  1. I: the first-person singular nominative personal pronoun.

Nheengatu edit

Etymology edit

From Old Tupi i.

Pronunciation edit

  This entry needs an audio pronunciation. If you are a native speaker with a microphone, please record this word. The recorded pronunciation will appear here when it's ready.
  • Hyphenation: i
  • Rhymes: -i

Pronoun edit

i

  1. (second-class) third-person singular personal pronoun (he, him, his, she, her, it, its)
    I akanhemu uikú nhaãsé i kirá uikú.
    He is scared because he is fat.
    Indé reputari repitá i irũmu.
    You want to stay with him.
    Indé remeẽ manungara i xupé.
    You give something to him.
    I manha uwiké uka pisasú upé.
    His mother enters the new house.

Usage notes edit

  • As a second-class pronoun, i is used as the subject of a sentence when its verb is a second-class one (those verbs are sometimes referred to as adjectives). The personal pronoun i is also used when governed by any postposition with the exception of arama. Unlike other second-class pronouns, i is used when governed by the postposition supé. Finally, i is used as a possessive pronoun as well.

See also edit

Nheengatu personal pronouns
singular first-class pronoun second-class pronoun
first-person ixé se
second-person indé ne
third-person i
plural first-class pronoun second-class pronoun
first-person yandé yané
second-person penhẽ pe
third-person aintá (or ) aintá (or )

References edit

North Frisian edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

i

  1. (Sylt) (second person plural subject pronoun) you, you all

See also edit

  • juu (object and possessive form)

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse í (in), from Proto-Germanic *in (in, into), from Proto-Indo-European *én (in).

Pronunciation edit

  • (letter name): IPA(key): /iː/
  • (phoneme): IPA(key): /iː/, /i/, /ɪ/

Letter edit

i

  1. The ninth letter of the Norwegian Bokmål alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Preposition edit

i

  1. (location) in, inside of
    Ligge i sengenLaying in bed
    Oppe i fjelleneUp in the mountains
  2. (duration of time) for, in, during
    Møtet varte (i) to timerThe meeting lasted two hours (literally, “The meeting went during two hours”)
    Han var utenlands i mange årHe lived abroad for many years
    I høst, i vår, i dag, i gårIn autumn, in spring, today, yesterday
  3. (condition, state) in
    Være i fredTo be in peace
    Være i god formTo be in shape (physically fit)
    Leve i fattigdomTo live in poverty
  4. (means, method) in
    Betale i gullTo pay in gold.
    Gjøre noe i all hastTo do something urgently (literally, “To do something in all haste”)
    i hemmelighetin secret
  5. pertaining to, in reference to
    I deg har jeg en sann venn.In you I have a true friend.

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse í, from Proto-Germanic *in (in, into). Akin to English in.

Preposition edit

i

  1. (location) in, inside of
    No er me i Noreg.We are currently in Norway.
  2. (duration of time) for, in, during
  3. (condition, state) in
  4. (means, method) in
  5. pertaining to, in reference to
Derived terms edit

Adverb edit

i

  1. Used together with certain verbs.

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin i, minuscule of I.

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (upper case I, definite singular i-en, indefinite plural i-ar, definite plural i-ane)

  1. The ninth letter of the Norwegian alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Pronoun edit

i (objective me, possessive min)

  1. (dialectal) alternative letter-case form of I; alternative form of eg (I)

Etymology 4 edit

From Old Norse ér, ír, from Proto-Germanic *jūz. Possibly via Danish I. Compare with de.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

i (objective jær or ær or ør, possessive jærs or ærs or ørs)

  1. (obsolete, dialectal, polite) you (second person singular)
    • 1853, Ivar Aasen, Prøver af Landsmaalet i Norge (overall work in Danish), Christiania: Carl C. Werner & Co., page 2:
      men æg undras paa, at i sku kjenn' mæg; æg trur aller, at æg kjenne ør; æg tyks aller ha sett ør før.
      Though I wonder how you would know me. I don't think I know you. I don't think I've ever seen you before.

References edit

  • “i” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • Torp, Alf (1919), “I”, in Nynorsk etymologisk ordbok, Kristiania: Aschehoug, page 240
  • Ivar Aasen (1850), “i”, in Ordbog over det norske Folkesprog, Oslo: Samlaget, published 2000

Anagrams edit

Nupe edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (phoneme): IPA(key): /i/, (after /n/ or /m/) /ĩ/

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The eleventh letter of the Nupe alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Occitan edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

i f (plural is)

  1. i (the letter i, I)

Derived terms edit

Old French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin hīc.

Adverb edit

i

  1. there

Descendants edit

  • French: y

Old Irish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Celtic *en (compare Welsh yn), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁én (compare English in, Latin in, Ancient Greek ἐν (en)).

The third-person singular masculine and neuter inflected dative form and is not derived from a contraction with a pronoun. Instead, it was originally an adverb with an independent etymology. See its page for its etymology.

Preposition edit

i (triggers eclipsis)

  1. in [+dative]
  2. into [+accusative]
  3. in regard to, as to [+dative]
  4. as [+accusative]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:i.

Inflection edit

Combinations with the definite article:

  • isin (accusative masculine/feminine singular)
  • issa (accusative neuter singular)
  • isind (dative singular)
  • isna (accusative plural)
  • isnaib (dative plural)

Combinations with possessive determiners:

  • im (in my) (1st person singular)
  • inna, na (in his/her/its/their) (3rd person)

The form i is unchanged in combination with a relative pronoun.

Descendants edit

  • Irish: i
  • Scottish Gaelic: an
  • Manx: ayns

Further reading edit

Old Occitan edit

Etymology edit

From Latin hīc.

Adverb edit

i

  1. there

Descendants edit

  • Occitan: i

Old Polish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *i. First attested in the 14th century.

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

i

  1. and (cumulative coordinating conjunction)

Descendants edit

  • Masurian: i
  • Polish: i
  • Silesian: i

References edit

Old Tupi edit

Alternative forms edit

  • î (after vowels)

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): (atonic) /i/
  • Rhymes: -i
  • Hyphenation: i

Pronoun edit

i (2nd class, 3rd person singular and plural, dative i xupé)

  1. (before adjectives) he, she, they, it
  2. him, her, them
  3. his, her, their, its
    I roka
    Her house
  4. (dummy pronoun) it
    Gûyrá i porang
    The bird is beautiful
    (literally, “bird it beautiful”)
    Aîkutuk
    I poked it

Descendants edit

  • Nheengatu: i

See also edit

References edit

Paicî edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Oceanic *kutu, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *kutu, from Proto-Austronesian *kuCu.

Noun edit

i

  1. louse

References edit

  • Jim Hollyman, K. J. Hollyman, Études sur les langues du Nord de la Nouvelle-Calédonie, page 52, 1999

Papiamentu edit

Alternative forms edit

  • y (alternative spelling)

Etymology edit

From Spanish y and Portuguese e and Kabuverdianu i.

Conjunction edit

i

  1. and

Pijin edit

Particle edit

i

  1. Separates the subject of a sentence from the predicate, used when the subject is a pronoun or a noun

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

The Polish orthography is based on the Latin alphabet. No earlier script is known. See the history of Polish orthography article on Wikipedia for more, and i for development of the glyph itself.

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The twelfth letter of the Polish alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Old Polish i.

Conjunction edit

i

  1. and
    Adam i Ewa tylko zjedli jabłko.Adam and Eve only ate an apple.
    Patrzę na nią i oczom nie wierzę.I look at her and can't believe my eyes.
  2. even
    Wychodząc i kaloryfer nam naprawił.Leaving he even repaired our radiator.
    I ślepa wiewiórka czasem znajdzie orzech.Even a blind squirrel finds an acorn sometimes.
    Ja krowy to i w telewizji nigdy nie widziałem.I never saw a cow, even on TV.
  3. also, too
    I mnie się podoba wasz wybór.I like your choice too.
    Czy i my?We too?
  4. so, so that
    Zmęczyłem się i nie byłem już w stanie grać w koszykówkę.I grew tired, so I couldn't play basketball anymore.
    Byłeś głupi, i cierp teraz.You were a fool, so now suffer.
  5. (i...i) as well as
    Polsce potrzebne są i armia, i flota.Poland needs an army as well as a navy.
  6. emphasizing particle
    I dobrze.Fine.
Derived terms edit
noun

Trivia edit

According to Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej (1990), i is one of the most used words in Polish, appearing 2473 times in scientific texts, 2409 times in news, 3061 times in essays, 2636 times in fiction, and 1806 times in plays, each out of a corpus of 100,000 words, totaling 12385 times, making it the 2nd most common word in a corpus of 500,000 words.[1]

References edit

  1. ^ Ida Kurcz (1990), “i”, in Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej [Frequency dictionary of the Polish language] (in Polish), Kraków; Warszawa: Polska Akademia Nauk. Instytut Języka Polskiego, page 148

Further reading edit

  • i in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • i in Polish dictionaries at PWN
  • i”, in Słownik Polszczyzny XVI Wieku [A Dictionary of 16th Century Polish], 2010-2023
  • i”, in Słownik Polszczyzny XVI Wieku [A Dictionary of 16th Century Polish], 2010-2023
  • I”, in Elektroniczny Słownik Języka Polskiego XVII i XVIII Wieku [Electronic Dictionary of the Polish Language of the XVII and XVIII Century], 16.09.2009
  • Samuel Bogumił Linde (1807–1814), “i”, in Słownik języka polskiego
  • Aleksander Zdanowicz (1861), “i”, in Słownik języka polskiego, Wilno 1861
  • J. Karłowicz, A. Kryński, W. Niedźwiedzki, editors (1900), “i”, in Słownik języka polskiego (in Polish), volume 1, Warsaw, page 71

Portuguese edit

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: i
  • (file)

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The ninth letter of the Portuguese alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Noun edit

i m (plural is)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter I.

Rapa Nui edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Polynesian *i.

Particle edit

i

  1. relational particle that marks the object of a verb

Usage notes edit

Used in all cases except with verbs of sensing; in which case, use e.

Preposition edit

i

  1. at
  2. in

Romani edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. (International Standard) The twelfth letter of the Romani alphabet, written in the Latin script.
  2. (Pan-Vlax) The thirteenth letter of the Romani alphabet, written in the Latin script.
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Article edit

i f sg (masculine singular o, plural e)

  1. the; feminine singular definite article
    i SperàncaSperanza
    i RumùniaRomania
Usage notes edit
  • The definite article is used with proper nouns (given names and place names) as well.
Declension edit

Romanian edit

Etymology 1 edit

See Translingual section.

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The eleventh letter of the Romanian alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script.
Usage notes edit

See I for notes on pronunciation.

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Church Slavonic и (i).

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

i

  1. (obsolete) and
    Synonym: și
Usage notes edit

Mostly used in the context of iproci (and so on...)

Samoan edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Polynesian *i.

Particle edit

i

  1. used to mark the following (noun or noun phrase) as a direct object

Preposition edit

i

  1. (indicating destination) to

Sardinian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin hīc (here).

Pronoun edit

i (adverbial)

  1. there (at a place)
  2. there, thither (to there)
    Synonyms: bi, nche

Sassarese edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin ī (the name of the letter I).

Noun edit

i f (invariable)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter I.; i

Etymology 2 edit

Apocopic form of in.

Preposition edit

i

  1. Alternative form of i'
    • 1989, Giovanni Maria Cherchi, “Un cuntaddu [A tale]”, in La poesia di l'althri [The poetry of others], Sassari: Arnoldo Mondadori Editore, page 47:
      Di la ziddài natiba i lu so’ cori
      diricaddu una mamma s’ammintaba
      ch’era verdhi e fiuridda che giardhinu.
      About the native town, in her delicate heart, a mother remembered it was as green and full of flowers as a garden.

Sathmar Swabian edit

Pronoun edit

i

  1. I

References edit

  • Claus Stephani, Volksgut der Sathmarschwaben (1985)

Savi edit

Noun edit

i

  1. water

References edit

  • Kendall D. Decker Languages of Chitral )1992), Sociolinguistic Survey of Northern Pakistan, 5. Islamabad: National Institute of Pakistan Studies, Quaid-i-Azam University and Summer Institute of Linguistics xxii, page 185

Scots edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English i, variant of in (in).

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

i

  1. in

Scottish Gaelic edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The ninth letter of the Scottish Gaelic alphabet, written in the Latin script. It is preceded by h and followed by l. Its traditional name is iodh (yew).
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Irish . Cognates include Irish and Manx ee.

Pronoun edit

i (emphatic ise)

  1. third-person feminine pronoun; she, her, it
See also edit

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology 1 edit

See Translingual section.

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (Cyrillic spelling и)

  1. The thirteenth letter of the Serbo-Croatian alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Slavic *i.

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

i (Cyrillic spelling и)

  1. and
    Ivica i Marica se voleIvica and Marica love each other.
    i tako daljeand so on
  2. (i… i…) bothand
    ne možeš istovremeno i tužiti i suditi.you can't simultaneously both sue and judge
  3. also, too, as well
    i meni se sviđa vaš odabirI like your choice too
  4. even (usually preceded by čȁk)
    (čak) i ja sam pozvan na zabavu!even I have been invited to the party
  5. (ne sȁmonȅgo/vȅć i…) also, too
    on je ne samo darovit, nego i jako marljivhe is not only talented, but also very industrious
  6. so, so that (= te, pa)
    umorio sam se i nisam mogao više igrati košarkuI grew tired, so I couldn't play basketball anymore

Sicilian edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin ī (the name of the letter I).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

i f

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter I.; i
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From the lenition of li, from the conflation of the apheresis of Latin illī and illae, both nominative plurals of ille.

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

i m pl or f pl

  1. (masculine and feminine plural definite article) the
    Synonym: li
Usage notes edit
  • As for other Romance languages, such as Neapolitan or Portuguese, Sicilian definite articles have undergone a consonant lenition that has led to the phonetic fall of the initial l. The use of this illiquid variant has not yet made the use of liquid variants disappear, but today it is still the prevalent use in speech and writing.
  • In the case of the production of literary texts, such as singing or poetry, or of formal and institutional texts, resorting to "liquid articles" and "liquid articulated prepositions" confers greater euphony to the text, although it may sound a form of courtly recovery.
  • Illiquid definite articles can be phonetically absorbed by the following noun. I.e: l'arancini (liquid) and ârancini (illiquid).
Inflection edit
Sicilian articles
Masculine singular definite article Feminine singular definite article Masculine and feminine plural definite article
Definite articles (liquid) lu la li
Definite articles (illiquid) u a i
Definite articles nu
(also: un, 'n)
na

Etymology 3 edit

From the lenition of li, from the conflation of the apheresis of Latin illī and illae, both nominative plurals of ille.

Alternative forms edit

  • li (liquid form)

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

i m pl or f pl

  1. (accusative) them
    Synonym: li
    I canusci?Do you know them?
  2. (accusative) it, this or that thing
    Synonym: li
    Quannu desi.When I gave them to you.
Usage notes edit
  • This pronoun can blend in contracted forms with other particles, especially other personal pronominal particles.
Inflection edit
Sicilian pronominal particles
Masculine singular pronominal particles Feminine singular pronominal particles Masculine and feminine plural pronominal particles
mi
ti
ci ci u ci a
ni
vi
ci ci u ci a

Silesian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈi/
  • Rhymes: -i
  • Syllabification: i

Etymology 1 edit

The Silesian orthography is based on the Latin alphabet. No earlier script is known. See the Silesian language article on Wikipedia for more, and i for development of the glyph itself.

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case i)

  1. The eleventh letter of the Silesian alphabet, written in the Latin script.
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Old Polish i.

Conjunction edit

i

  1. coordinating conjunction; and
    Synonym: a

Further reading edit

  • i in silling.org

Silimo edit

Noun edit

i

  1. water

References edit

Sirionó edit

Noun edit

i

  1. water

References edit

Skolt Sami edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (upper case I)

  1. The sixteenth letter of the Skolt Sami alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Slovak edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Slavic *i.

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

i

  1. and
  2. as well as

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • i”, in Slovníkový portál Jazykovedného ústavu Ľ. Štúra SAV [Dictionary portal of the Ľ. Štúr Institute of Linguistics, Slovak Academy of Science] (in Slovak), https://slovnik.juls.savba.sk, 2024

Slovene edit

 
Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sl

Etymology 1 edit

From Gaj's Latin alphabet i, from Czech alphabet i, from Latin i, lower case variation of I from the Etruscan letter 𐌉 (i, i), from the Ancient Greek letter Ι (I, iota), derived from the Phoenician letter ⁧𐤉(y, yod), from the Egyptian hieroglyph 𓂝.

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The tenth letter of the Slovene alphabet, written in the Latin script.
  2. The fifteenth letter of the Resian alphabet, written in the Latin script.
  3. The eleventh letter of the Natisone Valley dialect alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Symbol edit

i

  1. (SNPT) Phonetic transcription of sound [i].

Noun edit

ī m inan

  1. The name of the Latin script letter I / i.
  2. (linguistics) The name of the phoneme /i/.
Inflection edit
  • Overall more common
First masculine declension (soft o-stem, inanimate), fixed accent, -j- infix
nom. sing. i
gen. sing. i-ja
singular dual plural
nominative
imenovȃlnik
i i-ja i-ji
genitive
rodȋlnik
i-ja i-jev i-jev
dative
dajȃlnik
i-ju, i-ji i-jema i-jem
accusative
tožȋlnik
i i-ja i-je
locative
mẹ̑stnik
i-ju, i-ji i-jih i-jih
instrumental
orọ̑dnik
i-jem i-jema i-ji
(vocative)
(ogȏvorni imenovȃlnik)
i i-ja i-ji
  • More common when with a definite adjective
Third masculine declension (no endings), fixed accent
nom. sing. i
gen. sing. i
singular dual plural
nominative
imenovȃlnik
i i i
genitive
rodȋlnik
i i i
dative
dajȃlnik
i i i
accusative
tožȋlnik
i i i
locative
mẹ̑stnik
i i i
instrumental
orọ̑dnik
i i i
(vocative)
(ogȏvorni imenovȃlnik)
i i i
  • Dialectal, in common written language used till 19th century
First masculine declension (hard o-stem, inanimate), -j- infix
nom. sing. i
gen. sing. i-ja
singular dual plural
nominative
imenovȃlnik
i i-ja i-ji
genitive
rodȋlnik
i-ja i-jov i-jov
dative
dajȃlnik
i-ju, i-ji i-joma i-jom
accusative
tožȋlnik
i i-ja i-je
locative
mẹ̑stnik
i-ju, i-ji i-jih i-jih
instrumental
orọ̑dnik
i-jom i-joma i-ji
(vocative)
(ogȏvorni imenovȃlnik)
i i-ja i-ji

Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

i

  1. used to denote happiness after correct assumption
    Synonyms: a, aha, e, oho, olala
    I, pa si le lagal.
    Ha, you were lying afterall.

Etymology 3 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

i

  1. (archaic) used to denote unhappiness or unpleasant surprise
    Synonyms: ah, uh
  2. (archaic) used to denote that speaker is indifferent to the topic
    Synonyms: eh, e, o
    I ja, saj ti verjamem.
    Whatever, I believe you.

Etymology 4 edit

Derived from Proto-Slavic *i (and), itself from Proto-Indo-European *éy, an early locative singular determiner, formed from the root *h₁e-, *h₁o-. Cognates with Serbo-Croatian i, Macedonian и (i), Bulgarian и (i), Old Church Slavonic и (i), Czech i, Polish i, Kashubian ë, Slovak i, Belarusian і (i), Belarusian й (j), Carpathian Rusyn й (j), Ukrainian і (i), Ukrainian й (j), and Russian и (i).

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

i

  1. (obsolete) and
    Synonyms: in, ino, no, ter, pa
Usage notes edit

Use of i as a conjunction in Slovene is obsolete and not well-known, so most nowadays speakers usually relate it with other Slavic languages rather than with old Slovene. Nowadays, its derivative, in is used, which is etymologically speaking a stressed variant, but has since lost the initial difference.

As opposed to in, i can be pronounced as stressed or unstressed form in all contexts (but if taken out of context, only the stressed version is allowed) whereas in is stressed only if taken out of context.

Derived terms edit

Etymology 5 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Particle edit

i

  1. (obsolete) also
    Synonyms: tudi, prav tako, ravno tako, isto, istotako, še, vključno

Further reading edit

i”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Directly from Latin.

Letter edit

i (lower case, upper case I)

  1. The ninth letter of the Spanish alphabet, written in the Latin script.
    Synonym: i latina

Noun edit

i f (plural íes)

  1. name of the letter I

Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

See y.

Conjunction edit

i

  1. Obsolete spelling of y

Sranan Tongo edit

Pronoun edit

i

  1. Pronunciation spelling of yu.

Sumerian edit

Romanization edit

i

  1. Romanization of 𒄿
  2. Romanization of 𒉌

Swabian edit

Pronoun edit

i

  1. I

Swedish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Swedish ī, from Old Norse í, from Proto-Germanic *in.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

i (verb particle)

  1. used to signify that an action is done with intensity
Derived terms edit

Preposition edit

i

  1. in; located inside
  2. in; specifies a place, a region or a country
    Kim bor i Stockholm, som ligger i Sverige.
    Kim lives in Stockholm which lies in Sweden.
  3. (about time) to; before a full hour or, if used in the phrase "fem i halv", a half-hour
    Antonym: (past) över
    Middag serveras mellan sex och kvart i åtta varje kväll.
    Dinner is served between six and quarter to eight every evening.
  4. (about time) for; duration
    Jag sover i flera timmar.
    I sleep for several hours.
  5. (in various constructions) last, previous
    i måndags
    last Monday
    i julas
    last Christmas
Usage notes edit

In definition 5, (last, previous) the following noun gets a suffix -s (weekdays: i måndags) or -as (seasons: i höstas, certain holidays, e.g. jul, midsommar, påsk, pingst). Other holidays instead use förra, senaste, sista, e.g. förra nyåret.

Derived terms edit