inanimate

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

in- (not) +‎ animate

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈænɪmət/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

inanimate (comparative more inanimate, superlative most inanimate)

  1. Lacking the quality or ability of motion; as an inanimate object.
  2. Not being, and never having been alive, especially not like humans and animals.
    • 1818, Mary Shelley, chapter 5, in Frankenstein[1]:
      I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body.
  3. (grammar) Not animate.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

inanimate (plural inanimates)

  1. (rare) Something that is not alive.

Etymology 2Edit

Latin inanimō; equivalent to in- (intensive) +‎ animate

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

inanimate (third-person singular simple present inanimates, present participle inanimating, simple past and past participle inanimated)

  1. (obsolete) To animate.
    • 1621, John Donne, An Anatomy of the World: The First Anniversary
      For there's a kind of world remaining still, Though shee which did inanimate and fill

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

inanimate f pl

  1. feminine plural of inanimato

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

inanimāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of inanimātus