See also: Human and humán

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Middle English humayne, humain, from Middle French humain, from Old French humain, umain, from Latin hūmānus m (of or belonging to a man, human, humane, adjective), from humus, with unclear ū. Spelling human has been predominant since the early 18th century.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈ(h)juː.mən/, [ˈ(ç)ju̟ːmən], [ˈ(ç)ju̟ːmn̩]
  • (US) enPR: (h)yo͞oʹmən, (h)yo͞omʹn, IPA(key): /ˈ(h)ju.mən/, [ˈ(ç)ju̟mən], [ˈ(ç)ju̟mn̩]
    • (NYC, some other US dialects) IPA(key): /ˈju.mən/
  • (Indian English) IPA(key): /ˈhjuː.mən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːmən
  • Hyphenation: hu‧man

AdjectiveEdit

human (comparative more human, superlative most human)

  1. (not comparable) Of or belonging to the species Homo sapiens or its closest relatives.
    • c. 1587–1588, [Christopher Marlowe], Tamburlaine the Great. [] The First Part [], part 1, 2nd edition, London: [] [R. Robinson for] Richard Iones, [], published 1592, →OCLC; reprinted as Tamburlaine the Great (A Scolar Press Facsimile), Menston, Yorkshire; London: Scolar Press, 1973, →ISBN, Act II, scene vi:
      Some powers diuine, or els infernall, mixt / Their angry ſeedes at his conception: / For he was neuer ſprong of humaine race, / Since with the ſpirit of his fearefull pride, / He dares so doubtleſly reſolue of rule.
    • 1660, [Richard Allestree], “Sect[ion] V. Of the Second Advantage, Wealth.”, in The Gentlemans Calling, London: [] T[imothy] Garthwait [], →OCLC, page 83:
      [N]o attempt is made to call in God to their reſcue, as if he vvere an idle unconcern'd ſpectator of humane affairs, or ſo inconſiderable an ally, as not to be vvorth the care of engaging him on their ſide.
    • 2013 June 7, David Simpson, “Fantasy of navigation”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 36:
      Like most human activities, ballooning has sponsored heroes and hucksters and a good deal in between. For every dedicated scientist patiently recording atmospheric pressure and wind speed while shivering at high altitudes, there is a carnival barker with a bevy of pretty girls willing to dangle from a basket or parachute down to earth.
  2. (comparable) Having the nature or attributes of a human being.
    To err is human; to forgive, divine.

Alternative formsEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

HypernymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from the adjective or noun human

Pages starting with “human”.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

 
Rendition of the humans on the Pioneer 10 plaque.

human (plural humans)

  1. (strictly) The tallest, most abundant and most intelligent of primates; Homo sapiens.
    Humans share common ancestors with other apes.
    • 2013 May-June, Katie L. Burke, “In the News”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 193:
      Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola.
    Synonyms: human being, man; see also Thesaurus:person
  2. (broadly) Any hominid of the genus Homo.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

human (third-person singular simple present humans, present participle humaning, simple past and past participle humaned)

  1. (rare) To behave as or become, or to cause to behave as or become, a human.
    • 1911, Ambrose Bierce, “Music”, in The collected works of Ambrose Bierce, volume 9, page 362:
      [] he sought to charm a single pair of ears, and those more hairy than critical. Later, as the race went on humaning, there grew complexity of sentiment and varying emotional needs, []
    • 2013, Biosocial Becomings, →ISBN, page 19:
      There are, then, many ways of humaning: these are the ways along which we make ourselves and, collaboratively, one another.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Random House Dictionary, 2010

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit

CebuanoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: hu‧man

VerbEdit

human

  1. to finish

AdjectiveEdit

human

  1. completed; done

AdverbEdit

human

  1. after

QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:human.

DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

human

  1. human (having the nature or attributes of a human being)
    Synonym: menneskelig
  2. humane (something done from love to humanity)

InflectionEdit

Inflection of human
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular human 2
Neuter singular humant 2
Plural humane 2
Definite attributive1 humane
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

GermanEdit

 
German Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia de

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

human (strong nominative masculine singular humaner, comparative humaner, superlative am humansten)

  1. humane
    Synonym: menschlich

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • human” in Duden online
  • human” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

InterlinguaEdit

AdjectiveEdit

human (comparative plus human, superlative le plus human)

  1. human
  2. humane

Derived termsEdit

Northern SamiEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈhuman/

VerbEdit

human

  1. first-person singular present indicative of hupmat

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hūmānus.

AdjectiveEdit

human (neuter singular humant, definite singular and plural humane)

  1. humane

ReferencesEdit

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hūmānus.

AdjectiveEdit

human (neuter singular humant, definite singular and plural humane)

  1. humane

ReferencesEdit

RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hūmānus.

AdjectiveEdit

human m (feminine singular humana, masculine plural humans, feminine plural humanas)

  1. (Sursilvan) human

Alternative formsEdit

  • uman (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader)
  • umaun (Puter)

NounEdit

human m (plural humans; feminine humana, plural humanas)

  1. (Sursilvan) (male) human being
    Synonym: carstgaun

Alternative formsEdit

  • uman (Rumantsch Grischun, Surmiran, Vallader)
  • umaun (Puter)

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /xûmaːn/
  • Hyphenation: hu‧man

AdjectiveEdit

hȕmān (definite hȕmānī, comparative humaniji, Cyrillic spelling ху̏ма̄н)

  1. humane (with regard for the health and well-being of another; compassionate)

DeclensionEdit

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

human

  1. third-person plural present indicative of humar

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

human

  1. humane, decent, compassionate
    Deras politik har kritiserats för att inte vara human.
    Their politics have been criticised for being less than humane.
  2. (of prices) reasonable
    Det var ett humant pris.
    That was a reasonable price.

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of human
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular human humanare humanast
Neuter singular humant humanare humanast
Plural humana humanare humanast
Masculine plural3 humane humanare humanast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 humane humanare humanaste
All humana humanare humanaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic