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See also: anímate

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English animate, from Latin animatus, past participle of animare (to fill with breath, quicken, encourage, animate), from anima (breath); see anima.

PronunciationEdit

  • Adjective:
    • enPR: ăn'ĭmət, ăn'əmət, IPA(key): /ˈæ.nɪ.mət/, /ˈæ.nə.mət/
    • (file)
  • Verb:
    • enPR: ăn'ĭmāt, ăn'əmāt IPA(key): /ˈæ.nɪ.meɪt/, /ˈæ.nə.meɪt/
    • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

animate (comparative more animate, superlative most animate)

  1. That which lives.
  2. Possessing the quality or ability of motion.
  3. Dynamic, energetic.
    She is an engaging and animate speaker.
  4. (grammar, of a noun or pronoun) Having a referent that includes a human, animal, plant or other entity which is considered alive.
    Nouns can be singular or plural, and one of two genders, animate or inanimate.
  5. (grammar) Inflected to agree with an animate noun or pronoun.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

animate (third-person singular simple present animates, present participle animating, simple past and past participle animated)

  1. (transitive) To impart motion or the appearance of motion to.
    If we animate the model, we can see the complexity of the action.
  2. (transitive) To give spirit or vigour to; to stimulate or enliven; to inspirit.
    • Knolles
      The more to animate the people, he stood on high [] and cried unto them with a loud voice.

SynonymsEdit

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EsperantoEdit

AdverbEdit

animate

  1. present adverbial passive participle of animi

ItalianEdit

LatinEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin animatus, past participle of animō.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

animate

  1. Animate, alive; showing the signs or symptoms of life.
  2. Related to the soul or spirit of a living being (i.e. sentience or sapience).

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit