See also: incógnito

English

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Italian incognito, from Latin incognitus (unknown), from in- (not) +‎ cognitus (known), perfect passive participle of cognoscere.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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incognito (not comparable)

  1. Without being known; in an assumed character, or under an assumed title; in disguise.
    Coordinate term: incognita
    • 1703, Mat[thew] Prior, “The Ladle”, in Poems on Several Occasions, London: [] Jacob Tonson [], published 1709, →OCLC, stanza 1, page 125:
      THE Scepticks think 'twas long ago, / Since Gods came down Incognito; / To ſee who were their Friends or Foes, / And how our Actions fell or roſe.

Usage notes

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  • This term is used especially of great personages who sometimes adopt a disguise or an assumed character in order to avoid notice.

Translations

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Adverb

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incognito (not comparable)

  1. Without revealing one's identity.

Translations

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Noun

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incognito (countable and uncountable, plural incognitos)

  1. One unknown or in disguise, or under an assumed character or name.
    Coordinate term: incognita
  2. The assumption of disguise or of a feigned character; the state of being in disguise or not recognized.
    Coordinate term: incognita
    • 1829 January 1, Walter Scott, “General Preface”, in Waverley (Waverley Novels; I), Edinburgh: [] Cadell & Company; London: Simpkin and Marshall, page xxxii:
      Of those letters, and other attempts of the same kind, the author could not complain, though his incognito was endangered. He had challenged the public to a game at bo-peep, and if he was discovered in his “hiding-hole,” he must submit to the shame of detection.
    • 1834, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], chapter XX, in Francesca Carrara. [], volume III, London: Richard Bentley, [], (successor to Henry Colburn), →OCLC, page 169:
      It contained a letter from the King himself, craving hospitality for a few days, as his mother was about to visit England, and to take up with Lord Avonleigh her residence at the Castle. A slight incognito would be preserved, and as little form and ceremony expected as was possible.

Anagrams

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French

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Etymology

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From Italian.

Pronunciation

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Adverb

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incognito

  1. incognito

Adjective

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incognito (plural incognitos)

  1. incognito

Noun

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incognito m (plural incognitos)

  1. incognito

Further reading

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Italian

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Etymology

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From Latin incognitus.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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incognito (feminine incognita, masculine plural incogniti, feminine plural incognite)

  1. unknown
  2. (archaic) unaware; ignorant

Derived terms

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Noun

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incognito m (plural incogniti)

  1. incognito
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References

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  1. ^ incognito in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Latin

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Adjective

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incognitō

  1. dative/ablative masculine/neuter singular of incognitus

Polish

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Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology

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Unadapted borrowing from Italian incognito, from Latin incognitus.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /inˈkɔɡ.ɲi.tɔ/
  • Rhymes: -itɔ
  • Syllabification: in‧cog‧ni‧to

Adverb

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incognito (not comparable)

  1. (literary) incognito (without revealing one's identity)
    Synonym: anonimowo

Noun

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incognito n (indeclinable)

  1. (literary) incognito (assumption of disguise or of a feigned character; the state of being in disguise or not recognized)
    Synonym: anonimowość

Further reading

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  • incognito in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • incognito in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French incognito or Italian incognito.

Adjective

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incognito m or f or n (indeclinable)

  1. unknown

Declension

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Adverb

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incognito

  1. unknown