See also: incógnito

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Italian incognito, from Latin incognitus (unknown), from in- (not) + cognitus (known), perfect passive participle of cognoscere.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

incognito (not comparable)

  1. without being known; in disguise; in an assumed character, or under an assumed title.
    • 1891, Arthur Conan Doyle, A Scandal In Bohemia:
      "But you can understand," said our strange visitor, sitting down once more and passing his hand over his high white forehead, “you can understand that I am not accustomed to doing such business in my own person. Yet the matter was so delicate that I could not confide it to an agent without putting myself in his power. I have come incognito from Prague for the purpose of consulting you.”

Usage notesEdit

This term is said especially of great personages who sometimes adopt a disguise or an assumed character in order to avoid notice.

QuotationsEdit

  • 'Twas long ago/Since gods come down incognito. —Prior.
  • The prince royal of Persia came thither incognito. —Tatler.

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

incognito (not comparable)

  1. Without revealing one's identity.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

incognito (plural incognitos)

  1. One unknown or in disguise, or under an assumed character or name.
  2. The assumption of disguise or of a feigned character; the state of being in disguise or not recognized.

QuotationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

incognito

  1. incognito

AdverbEdit

incognito m, f (plural incognitos)

  1. incognito

NounEdit

incognito m (plural incognitos)

  1. incognito

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

incognito m (feminine singular incognita, masculine plural incogniti, feminine plural incognite)

  1. unknown

NounEdit

incognito m (plural incogniti)

  1. incognito

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit