ignorant

See also: Ignorant

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French ignorant. Surface analysis: ignore +‎ -ant.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /ˈɪɡnəɹənt/

AdjectiveEdit

ignorant (comparative ignoranter or more ignorant, superlative ignorantest or most ignorant)

  1. Unknowledgeable or uneducated; characterized by ignorance.
    • 1664, John Tillotson, The Wisdom of Being Religious, London: Sa[muel] Gellibrand, p. 9,[1]
      That man that doth not know those things which are of use and necessity for him to know, is but an ignorant man, whatever he may know besides;
    • 1766, Oliver Goldsmith, The Vicar of Wakefield, London: F. Newbery, Volume I, Chapter 15, p. 150,[2]
      The ignorant peasant, without fault, is greater than the philosopher with many; for what is genius or courage without an heart?
  2. Not knowing (a fact or facts), unaware (of something).
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, 2 Corinthians 1:8,[3]
      For we would not, brethren, have you ignorant of our trouble which came to us in Asia, that we were pressed out of measure, above strength, insomuch that we despaired even of life:
    • 1677, John Dryden, The State of Innocence and Fall of Man, London: Henry Herringman, Act II, p. 14,[4]
      Eve. Somewhat forbids me, which I cannot name;
      For ignorant of guilt, I fear not shame:
      But some restraining thought, I know not why,
      Tells me, you long should beg, I long deny.
    • 1851, Walt Whitman, “Art and Artists” in Emory Holloway (editor), The Uncollected Poetry and Prose of Walt Whitman, Garden City, NY: Doubleday, Page & Co., 1921, Volume 1, p. 242,[5]
      [] perhaps it is sometimes the case that the greatest artists live and die, the world and themselves alike ignorant what they possess.
    • 1921, John T. McCutcheon, The Restless Age, Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, p. 179,[6]
      That night he slept the sleep of happiness, blissfully ignorant that he had placed the letters in the wrong envelopes.
  3. (slang) Ill-mannered, crude.
    His manner was at best off-hand, at worst totally ignorant.
  4. (obsolete) unknown; undiscovered
    • c. 1604, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act IV, Scene 2,[7]
      Alas, what ignorant sin have I committed?
    • c. 1610, William Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale, Act I, Scene 2,[8]
      [] I beseech you,
      If you know aught which does behove my knowledge
      Thereof to be inform’d, imprison't not
      In ignorant concealment.
    • 1845, Robert Browning, letter addressed to Elizabeth Barrett Browning, cited in Percy Lubbock, Elizabeth Barrett Browning in Her Letters, London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1906, Chapter 4, p. 106,[9]
      [] as to you, your goodness and understanding will always see to the bottom of involuntary or ignorant faults—always help me to correct them.
  5. Resulting from ignorance; foolish; silly.
    • c. 1609, William Shakespeare, Cymbeline, Act III, Scene 1,[10]
      [] his shipping—
      Poor ignorant baubles!— upon our terrible seas,
      Like eggshells moved upon their surges, crack’d
      As easily ’gainst our rocks:
    • 1916, Mark Twain, The Mysterious Stranger edited by Albert Paine, New York: Harper & Bros., Chapter 8, p. 112,[11]
      He had never felt a pain or a sorrow, and did not know what they were, in any really informing way. He had no knowledge of them except theoretically—that is to say, intellectually. And of course that is no good. One can never get any but a loose and ignorant notion of such things except by experience.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

ignorant (plural ignorants)

  1. One who is ignorant.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin ignōrāns.

AdjectiveEdit

ignorant (masculine and feminine plural ignorants)

  1. ignorant
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

ignorant

  1. present participle of ignorar

Further readingEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ignorant m

  1. ignoramus, ignorant
    Synonyms: nevědomec, neználek
    Antonym: znalec
    Antonym: vševěd

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ignōrāns (not knowing).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [injoˈʁɑnˀd̥], [enjoˈʁɑnˀd̥], [inoˈʁɑnˀd̥]

AdjectiveEdit

ignorant (plural and definite singular attributive ignorante)

  1. ignorant

InflectionEdit

ignorant

NounEdit

ignorant c (singular definite ignoranten, plural indefinite ignoranter)

  1. ignoramus

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ignorant (comparative ignoranter, superlative ignorantst)

  1. ignorant

InflectionEdit

Inflection of ignorant
uninflected ignorant
inflected ignorante
comparative ignoranter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial ignorant ignoranter het ignorantst
het ignorantste
indefinite m./f. sing. ignorante ignorantere ignorantste
n. sing. ignorant ignoranter ignorantste
plural ignorante ignorantere ignorantste
definite ignorante ignorantere ignorantste
partitive ignorants ignoranters

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin ignōrāns.

AdjectiveEdit

ignorant (feminine singular ignorante, masculine plural ignorants, feminine plural ignorantes)

  1. ignorant
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

ignorant

  1. present participle of ignorer

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ignōrāns.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ignorant (comparative ignoranter, superlative am ignorantesten)

  1. ignorant

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • ignorant in Duden online
  • ignorant” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ignōrant

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of ignōrō

PiedmonteseEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ignorant

  1. ignorant

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

ignorant m

  1. ignorant (person)



Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /iɡnǒrant/
  • Hyphenation: ig‧no‧rant

NounEdit

ignòrant m (Cyrillic spelling игно̀рант)

  1. ignorant

DeclensionEdit