inconstans

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From in- +‎ cōnstāns (standing firm, unchangeable).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

incōnstāns (genitive incōnstantis, adverb incōnstanter); third-declension one-termination adjective

  1. changeable, inconstant, fickle, capricious, inconsistent

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension one-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative incōnstāns incōnstantēs incōnstantia
Genitive incōnstantis incōnstantium
Dative incōnstantī incōnstantibus
Accusative incōnstantem incōnstāns incōnstantēs incōnstantia
Ablative incōnstantī incōnstantibus
Vocative incōnstāns incōnstantēs incōnstantia

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Catalan: inconstant
  • English: inconstant
  • French: inconstant

ReferencesEdit

  • inconstans in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • inconstans in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • inconstans in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a man of character, with a strong personality: vir constans, gravis (opp. homo inconstans, levis)
    • (ambiguous) consistency: constantia (opp. inconstantia) (Tusc. 5. 11. 32)