intolerable

See also: intolérable

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French intolerable, from Latin intolerābilis. Synchronically, in- +‎ tolerable.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

intolerable (comparative more intolerable, superlative most intolerable)

  1. not tolerable; not capable of being borne or endured
    Synonyms: insufferable, insupportable, unbearable
  2. extremely offensive or insulting.
    • 1971, William S. Burroughs, The Wild Boys: A Book of the Dead, page 4
      It is an intolerable sound that sets spoons tinkling in saucers and windowpanes vibrating.

Usage notesEdit

  • Nouns to which "intolerable" is often applied: cruelty, burden, situation, condition, pain, heat, position, life, state, suffering, evil, risk, insult, hardship, agony, behavior, affront, insolence, stress, consequence, people.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

ReferencesEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin intolerābilis. Synchronically, in- +‎ tolerable.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

intolerable (masculine and feminine plural intolerables)

  1. intolerable
    Synonym: insuportable
    Antonym: tolerable

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin intolerābilis. Synchronically, in- +‎ tolerable.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /intoleˈɾable/, [ĩn̪t̪oleˈɾaβle]

AdjectiveEdit

intolerable (plural intolerables)

  1. intolerable
    Synonym: insoportable
    Antonym: tolerable

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit