offensive

See also: Offensive

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French offensif, from Medieval Latin offensivus, from Latin offendere (to offend), past participle offensus; see offend.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /əˈfɛnsɪv/
  • (file)
  • (sports): (US) IPA(key): /ˈɔˌfɛnsɪv/

AdjectiveEdit

offensive (comparative more offensive, superlative most offensive)

  1. Causing offense; arousing a visceral reaction of disgust, anger, or hatred.
    • 2016 September 12, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, “Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: Political Incorrectness Is Just a Strategy”, in Time[1]:
      A survey at Yale University had 63% of students wanting professors to issue “trigger warnings” before saying anything that some might find offensive or could cause painful emotions.
    Some people find pornography offensive.
    An offensive smell.
    Antonym: inoffensive
  2. Relating to an offense or attack, as opposed to defensive.
    • 2013 June 7, Ed Pilkington, “‘Killer robots’ should be banned in advance, UN told”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 6:
      In his submission to the UN, [Christof] Heyns points to the experience of drones. Unmanned aerial vehicles were intended initially only for surveillance, and their use for offensive purposes was prohibited, yet once strategists realised their perceived advantages as a means of carrying out targeted killings, all objections were swept out of the way.
    The army's offensive capabilities. An offensive weapon.
    Antonym: defensive
  3. (sports) Having to do with play directed at scoring.
    The offensive coordinator is responsible for ordering all rushing plays.

Usage notesEdit

  • When the second syllable is emphasized, "offensive" is defined as "insulting". When the first syllable is emphasized, it refers to the attacker in a conflict or a sport.
  • Nouns to which "offensive" is often applied: content, material, language, word, comment, remark, statement, speech, joke, humor, image, picture, art, behavior, conduct, act, action.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

offensive (countable and uncountable, plural offensives)

  1. (countable, military) An attack.
    The Marines today launched a major offensive.
  2. (uncountable) The posture of attacking or being able to attack.
    He took the offensive in the press, accusing his opponent of corruption.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Further readingEdit


DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

offensive

  1. plural and definite singular attributive of offensiv

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

offensive f (plural offensives)

  1. (military) offensive (an attack)
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • German: Offensive

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

AdjectiveEdit

offensive

  1. feminine singular of offensif

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

offensive

  1. inflection of offensiv:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /of.fenˈsi.ve/
  • Hyphenation: of‧fen‧sì‧ve
  • Rhymes: -ive

AdjectiveEdit

offensive

  1. feminine plural of offensivo

NounEdit

offensive f

  1. plural of offensiva

Norwegian BokmålEdit

AdjectiveEdit

offensive

  1. definite singular/plural of offensiv

Norwegian NynorskEdit

AdjectiveEdit

offensive

  1. definite singular/plural of offensiv