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See also: Intuition and intuïtion

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French intuition, from Medieval Latin intuitio (a looking at, immediate cognition), from Latin intueri (to look at, consider), from in (in, on) + tueri (to look, watch, guard, see, observe).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌɪntjʊˈɪʃən/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪntuwˈɪʃɨn/
  • (file)

NounEdit

intuition (countable and uncountable, plural intuitions)

  1. Immediate cognition without the use of conscious rational processes.
    • 1988, Andrew Radford, Transformational Grammar, Cambridge: University Press, →ISBN, page 4:
      The native speaker's grammatical competence is reflected in two types of
      intuition which speakers have about their native language(s) — (i) intuitions
      about sentence well-formedness, and (ii) intuitions about sentence structure.
      The word intuition is used here in a technical sense which has become stand-
      ardised in Linguistics: by saying that a native speaker has intuitions about the
      well-formedness and structure of sentences, all we are saying is that he has the
      ability to make judgments about whether a given sentence is well-formed or
      not, and about whether it has a particular structure or not. [...]
  2. A perceptive insight gained by the use of this faculty.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

intuition c (singular definite intuitionen, plural indefinite intuitioner)

  1. intuition

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


FinnishEdit

NounEdit

intuition

  1. Genitive singular form of intuitio.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Medieval Latin intuītiō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

intuition f (plural intuitions)

  1. (uncountable, philosophy) intuition (cognitive faculty)
  2. (countable) intuition, hunch
  3. premonition

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit