See also: Intuition and intuïtion

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EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French intuition, from Medieval Latin intuitio ‎(a looking at, immediate cognition), from Latin intueri ‎(to look at, consider), from in ‎(in, on) + tueri ‎(to look, watch, guard, see, observe).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

intuition ‎(plural intuitions)

  1. Immediate cognition without the use of conscious rational processes.
    • 1988, Andrew Radford, Transformational Grammar, Cambridge: University Press, ISBN 0-521-34750-5, page 4:
      The native speaker's grammatical competence is reflected in two types of
      intuition which speakers have about their native language(s) — (i) intuitions
      about sentence well-formedness, and (ii) intuitions about sentence structure.
      The word intuition is used here in a technical sense which has become stand-
      ardised in Linguistics: by saying that a native speaker has intuitions about the
      well-formedness and structure of sentences, all we are saying is that he has the
      ability to make judgments about whether a given sentence is well-formed or
      not, and about whether it has a particular structure or not. [...]
  2. A perceptive insight gained by the use of this faculty.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


FinnishEdit

NounEdit

intuition

  1. Genitive singular form of intuitio.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

NounEdit

intuition f ‎(plural intuitions)

  1. intuition, hunch
  2. premonition
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