Open main menu

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English kyken, kiken, keken (to look, peep), probably from Middle Dutch kiken, kieken or Middle Low German kîken (to look, peep), from Old Saxon *kīkan (to look), from Proto-Germanic *kīkaną (to look). Cognate with Dutch kijken (to look), German Low German kieken (to look), Estonian kiikama (to look, to peek), German kucken, gucken (to look), Danish kigge, kikke (to look, peep), Swedish kika (to peep, peek, keek, pry), Icelandic kíkja (to look, check). Perhaps related to kick.

The words peek, keek and peep were used more or less synonymously in the 14th and 15th centuries.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

keek (third-person singular simple present keeks, present participle keeking, simple past and past participle keeked)

  1. To peek; peep.
    The man keeked over the fence.

NounEdit

keek (plural keeks)

  1. A look, especially a quick one; a peek.
    She had a keek at the boy seated behind her who was busily writing something.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • keek” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  • keek” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.

CornishEdit

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eːk
  • IPA(key): /keːk/

VerbEdit

keek

  1. singular past indicative of kijken

AnagramsEdit


ScotsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Possibly from Middle English kiken.

VerbEdit

keek (third-person singular present keeks, present participle keekin, past keeked, past participle keeked)

  1. To have a quick look or peek.
  2. To tilt or lean back.
Related termsEdit

NounEdit

keek (plural keeks)

  1. A quick look or peek.

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

keek (plural keeks)

  1. A cap made of linen worn around the head and neck.

ReferencesEdit