EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɪlt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪlt
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English tilte, from Old English tyltan (to be unsteady), related to the adjective tealt (unsteady), from Proto-Germanic *taltaz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *del-, *dul- (to shake, hesitate), see also Dutch touteren (to tremble), North Frisian talt, tolt (unstable, shaky).[1]. Cognate with Icelandic tölt (an ambling place).

The nominal sense of "a joust" appears around 1510, presumably derived from the barrier which separated the combatants, which suggests connection with tilt "covering". The modern transitive meaning is from 1590; the intransitive use appears 1620.

VerbEdit

tilt (third-person singular simple present tilts, present participle tilting, simple past and past participle tilted)

  1. (transitive) To slope or incline (something); to slant. [1590]
    Tilt the barrel to pour out its contents.
  2. (jousting) To charge (at someone) with a lance. [1590]
  3. (intransitive) To be at an angle. [1620]
    • 1701, Nehemiah Grew, Cosmologia Sacra
      The trunk of the body is kept from tilting forward by the muscles of the back.
    • 2012 May 20, Nathan Rabin, “TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “Marge Gets A Job” (season 4, episode 7; originally aired 11/05/1992)”, in The Onion AV Club[1]:
      “Marge Gets A Job” opens with the foundation of the Simpson house tilting perilously to one side, making the family homestead look like the suburban equivalent of the Leaning Tower Of Pisa.
  4. (transitive) To point or thrust a weapon at.
  5. (transitive) To point or thrust (a weapon).
    • 1708, John Philips, Cyder
      Sons against fathers tilt the fatal lance.
  6. To forge (something) with a tilt hammer.
    to tilt steel in order to render it more ductile
  7. (poker, video games) To play worse than usual (often as a result of previous bad luck or losses).
  8. (pinball, of a machine) To intentionally let the ball fall down to the drain by disabling flippers and most targets, done as a punishment to the player when the machine is nudged too violently or frequently.
SynonymsEdit
Coordinate termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

tilt (plural tilts)

  1. A slope or inclination.
  2. The inclination of part of the body, such as backbone, pelvis, head, etc.
  3. (photography) The controlled vertical movement of a camera, or a device to achieve this.
  4. A jousting contest. (countable) [1510]
    • 1928, Edgar Rice Burroughs, chapter 11, in Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle, page 139:
      Justs and tilts were held here weekly, while the great tourneys that occurred less often were given upon a field outside the castle wall upon the floor of the valley.
  5. An attempt at something, such as a tilt at public office.
    • 2011 December 7, Phil McNulty, “Man City 2 - 0 Bayern Munich”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      City will now make the Premier League an even bigger priority, while regrouping and planning again for what they hope will be another tilt at the Champions League next season.
  6. A thrust, as with a lance.
    • 1716 December 9, Joseph Addison, “The Free-holder: No. 10. Wednesday, November 28. [1716.] [Julian calendar]”, in The Works of the Right Honourable Joseph Addison, Esq; [], volume IV, London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], published 1721, OCLC 1056445272:
      His Majesty [] entertain'd him with the Slaughter of two or three of his Liege Subjects, whom he very dexterously put to Death with the Tilt of his Lance.
  7. A tilt hammer.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 193-94

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English telte, tield, teld, from Old English teld (tent), from Proto-West Germanic *teld, from Proto-Germanic *teldą (tent). Perhaps influenced by Middle Low German telt,[1] or Danish telt.[2] Cognates include German Zelt (tent), Old Norse tjald (tent) (whence also archaic Danish tjæld (tent)). More at teld.

NounEdit

tilt (plural tilts)

  1. A canvas covering for carts, boats, etc. [1450]
    • 1907, Barbara Baynton, Sally Krimmer; Alan Lawson, editors, Human Toll (Portable Australian Authors: Barbara Baynton), St Lucia: University of Queensland Press, published 1980, page 253:
      The tilt hooding the spring-cart was insecure - even the jolt from the down-and-up curving river bend near the house had brought it down twice.
  2. Any covering overhead; especially, a tent.
    • a. 1669, John Denham, To Sir John Mennis, being invited from Calais to Boulogne, to eat a Pig
      But the rain made an ass
      Of tilt and canvas

VerbEdit

tilt (third-person singular simple present tilts, present participle tilting, simple past and past participle tilted)

  1. (transitive) To cover with a tilt, or awning.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tilt

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of tillen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of tillen

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tilt

  1. (transitive) to forbid, prohibit

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

(With verbal prefixes):

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • tilt in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English tilt.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tilt m (invariable)

  1. haywire state; breakdown; crash; down; out of order
    Il servizio è andato in tilt tra le 12 e le 15.
    The service went down between 12 pm and 3 pm.
    Il computer è andato in tilt.
    The computer crashed.
    (literally, “went in crash”)
    Martedì il sito del presidente è stato in tilt per varie ore.
    On Tuesday, the president's site was down for several hours.
  2. short-circuit (unintended current flow)
  3. tilt (pinball machine state)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ tilt in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Further readingEdit

  • tilt in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana