EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English knowen (known), from Old English cnāwen (known, recognised, perceived), past participle of cnāwan (to know, recognise, perceive). More at know.

VerbEdit

knowen

  1. (archaic) past participle of know
    • King James VI and I
      [] and it is vulgarly well knowen that thornes signifie stinging and pricking cares.

AnagramsEdit


CornishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From know +‎ -en.

NounEdit

knowen f

  1. (Revived Middle Cornish) singulative of know (nuts)

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English cnāwan (to know, recognise, perceive), from Proto-Germanic *knēaną.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

knowen

  1. to know (possess knowledge)
    • a. 1382, John Wycliffe, “2 Paralipomenon 6:30”, in Wycliffe's Bible:
      [] þou ſchalt heꝛe fro heuene: þat is fro þin hiȝe dwellyng place and do þou meꝛcy and ȝelde þou to ech man aftir hiſe weies whiche þou knowiſt þat he haþ in his heꝛte for þou aloone knowiſt þe heꝛtis of þe ſones of men
      , then you should hear from heaven, i.e. from your lofty place of residence. Forgive, and treat any individual according to their actions, which you know what their hearts contain, because only you know the hearts of humanity.
    • a. 1472, Thomas Malory, “Capitulum xix”, in [Le Morte Darthur], book IX, [London: [] by William Caxton], published 31 July 1485, OCLC 71490786; republished as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, Le Morte Darthur [], London: Published by David Nutt, [], 1889, OCLC 890162034, lines 28-31:
      [] for as to me I ded to hym no displeaſyre / and god knoweth I am ful ſory for hys diſeaſe and malady / Soo when the king had excuſed him / they were frendes []
      Because about myself, I didn't do any attacks on him, and God knows that I'm totally distressed about his disease and malady. So when the king had excused him (they were friends) []

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: know
  • Scots: knaw
  • Yola: knou, knouwe