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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

VerbEdit

knaw (third-person singular simple present knaws, present participle knawing, simple past and past participle knawed)

  1. Archaic spelling of gnaw.

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

knaw (third-person singular simple present knaws, present participle knawing, simple past knawed, past participle knawn)

  1. Eye dialect spelling of know.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

knaw

  1. Alternative form of knave

Middle WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably borrowed from Old Irish cnáim (bone),[1] but at any rate ultimately from Proto-Celtic *knāmis, from Proto-Indo-European *kónh₂m (leg). Cognate with Ancient Greek κνήμη (knḗmē, tibia) and English ham.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

knaw m (plural kneu or knouein)

  1. bone
  2. skull

DescendantsEdit

  • Welsh: pencnaw (end of a bone)

MutationEdit

Middle Welsh mutation
Radical Soft Nasal Aspirate
knaw gnaw knaw / chnaw
pronounced with /ŋ̥-/
chnaw
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950-), “cnaw”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 211