Contents

EnglishEdit

Gray langur

EtymologyEdit

From Hindi and Urdu लंगूर ‎(laṅgūr) / لنگور ‎(lãṅgūr), from Sanskrit लाङ्गूलिन् ‎(lāṅgūlin).

PronunciationEdit

(US) IPA(key): /lʌŋ.ˈgʊər/

NounEdit

langur ‎(plural langurs)

  1. Any of the Old World monkeys of the subfamily Colobinae, in the genera Simias, Trachypithecus (lutungs), Presbytis, (surilis), and Semnopithecus, (gray langurs).
  2. A gibbon of the genus Hoolock.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse langr, from Proto-Germanic *langaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dl̥h₁gʰós.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

langur ‎(comparative longri, superlative longstur)

  1. long

DeclensionEdit

langur a13
Singular (eintal) m (kallkyn) f (kvennkyn) n (hvørkikyn)
Nominative (hvørfall) langur long langt
Accusative (hvønnfall) langan langa
Dative (hvørjumfall) longum langari longum
Genitive (hvørsfall) (langs) (langar) (langs)
Plural (fleirtal) m (kallkyn) f (kvennkyn) n (hvørkikyn)
Nominative (hvørfall) langir langar long
Accusative (hvønnfall) langar
Dative (hvørjumfall) longum
Genitive (hvørsfall) (langa)

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse langr, from Proto-Germanic *langaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dl̥h₁gʰós.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

langur ‎(comparative lengri, superlative lengstur)

  1. long (of distance or time or the length of an object)

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

langur m

  1. only used in set phrases

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin languor.

NounEdit

langur m, f

  1. (Anglo-Norman) languor (weakness due to illness)
    • circa 1150, Thomas d'Angleterre, Le Roman de Tristan, page 222 (of the Champion Classiques edition, ISBN 2-7453-0520-4), lines 2920-1:
      la peine qu'ad e la dolur
      e coment il gist en langur
      the pain and the anguish that he has
      and how his is lying in languor

Usage notesEdit

  • Like other words ending in -or that are masculine in Latin and feminine in modern French, about evenly split between masculine and feminine usage. Most citations do not demonstrate a gender (like the one above).

ReferencesEdit

Read in another language