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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Middle English langour, langor, borrowed from Old French langueur, from Latin languor (faintness, languor), from languere (to feel faint, languish).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

languor (countable and uncountable, plural languors)

  1. (uncountable) a state of the body or mind caused by exhaustion or disease and characterized by a languid feeling: lassitude
    languor of convalescence
  2. (countable) listless indolence; dreaminess
    a certain languor in the air hinted at an early summer -- James Purdy
  3. (uncountable) dullness, sluggishness; lack of vigor; stagnation
    from languor she passed to the lightest vivacity -- Elinor Wylie
  4. (obsolete, countable) An enfeebling disease; suffering

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From langueō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

languor m (genitive languōris); third declension

  1. faintness, feebleness, languor, apathy

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative languor languōrēs
Genitive languōris languōrum
Dative languōrī languōribus
Accusative languōrem languōrēs
Ablative languōre languōribus
Vocative languor languōrēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • languor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • languor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • languor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to abandon oneself to inactivity and apathy: desidiae et languori se dedere
    • to weary, bore the reader: languorem, molestiam legentium animis afferre

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin languor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

languor m (plural languores)

  1. (rare) languor

Related termsEdit