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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English lynspin, compound of lins(axletree) and pin, from Old English lynis(linchpin), from Proto-Germanic *luniso (compare German Lünse), from Proto-Indo-European (compare Welsh olwyn(wheel), Old Armenian ողն(ołn, back; spine, backbone), Sanskrit आणि(āṇí, linchpin)). Figurative use attested from the mid-20th century.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

linchpin ‎(plural linchpins)

  1. a pin inserted through holes at the end of an axle, so as to secure a wheel
  2. (figuratively) a central cohesive source of stability and security; a person or thing that is critical to a system or organisation.

TranslationsEdit