AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown. Compare Arabic عَلَم(ʿalam). The standard Albanian equivalent is flamur.

NounEdit

lon m

  1. (Arbëresh) flag

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish lon.

NounEdit

lon m (genitive singular loin, nominative plural lonta)

  1. blackbird (Turdus merula)

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse lón. Akin to Icelandic lón.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lon f (definite singular lona, indefinite plural loner, definite plural lonene)

  1. a depression in the bottom of a river or creek
    Synonym: høl
  2. a portion of a creek with slow-flowing water

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lon m

  1. blackbird

InflectionEdit

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative lon lonL luinL
Vocative luin lonL lunuH
Accusative lonN lonL lunuH
Genitive luinL lon lonN
Dative lunL lonaib lonaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: lon, lon dubh
  • Manx: lhondoo, lhonnag
  • Scottish Gaelic: lon, lon-dubh

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
lon
also llon after a proclitic
lon
pronounced with /l(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

RomaniEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Sanskrit लवण (lavaṇa). Compare Hindi लोन (lon, salt) and Punjabi ਲੂਣ (lūṇ, salt)

NounEdit

lon m

  1. salt

ReferencesEdit

  • Yaron Matras (2002), “Historical and linguistic origins”, in Romani: A Linguistic Introduction[1], Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 40

Scottish GaelicEdit

 
Loin anns an t-Saoghal Ùr

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Irish lon. Compare Irish lon. Cognate with Old Church Slavonic лань (lanĭ, hind) and also related to Proto-Celtic *elantī (doe, hind) (whence eilid (hind)).

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /ɫ̪ɔn/

NounEdit

lon m (genitive singular loin, plural loin)

  1. moose
  2. elk

Etymology 2Edit

Apparently a condensation of lomhainn from St Kilda.

NounEdit

lon m (genitive singular loin, plural lonan)

  1. a rope of raw hides

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle Irish lon, from Old Irish lon.

NounEdit

lon m (genitive singular loin, plural loin)

  1. blackbird (Turdus merula)
  2. ouzel (Cinclus mexicanus)

Etymology 4Edit

Shortening of lon-chraois, apparently from Middle Irish con cráis (gluttony). Kuno Keyer translates lon separately as "demon". Others suggest lon as "water". See craos for its etymology.

NounEdit

lon m (genitive singular loin, no plural)

  1. insatiable hunger
  2. unquenchable thirst
  3. gluttony
  4. voracity

Sranan TongoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English run.

VerbEdit

lon

  1. to run

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

lon

  1. definite singular of lo

VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

(classifier cái) lon (, 𨫅)

  1. beverage can

Etymology 2Edit

From French galon.

NounEdit

lon

  1. (military, informal) stripe
Derived termsEdit

WalloonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin longe, from the adjective longus (long, far-off).

AdverbEdit

lon

  1. far

AntonymsEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lon

  1. Soft mutation of llon.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
llon lon unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.