See also: lissé

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English līssian.

VerbEdit

lisse (third-person singular simple present lisses, present participle lissing, simple past and past participle lissed)

  1. (obsolete) To relieve, mitigate, assuage (pain etc.).
    • Late 14th century: And on his wey forthward thanne is he fare / In hope for to been lissed of his care. — Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Franklin's Tale’, Canterbury Tales

Etymology 2Edit

French lisse, from Latin licium.

NounEdit

lisse (countable and uncountable, plural lisses)

  1. A fine sheer fabric of silk or cotton used in women's neckwear and in ruching.
  2. In tapestry, the threads of the warp taken together.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Probably from lisser.

AdjectiveEdit

lisse (plural lisses)

  1. smooth

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

lisse

  1. first-person singular present indicative of lisser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of lisser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of lisser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of lisser
  5. second-person singular imperative of lisser

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


TarantinoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lisse

  1. smooth

WalloonEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lisse (masculine and feminine, plural lisses)

  1. smooth

SynonymsEdit