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See also: List, līst, лист, and ліст

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

The white printed strip is the selvage of a piece of cloth. Such selvage is sometimes made with list (sense 2)
A list (sense 3) of the Roman Catholic popes buried in St. Peter’s Basilica on a plaque at the entrance to the Sacristy

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lī̆st, lī̆ste (band, stripe; hem, selvage; border, edge, rim; list, specification; barriers enclosing area for jousting, etc.), from Old English līste (hem, edge, strip), or Old French liste, listre (border; band; strip of paper; list), or Medieval Latin lista,[1] all from Proto-Germanic *līstǭ (band, strip; hem, selvage; border, edge), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *leys- (to trace, track). The word is cognate with Dutch lijst (list), Finnish lista ((informal) list; batten), Galician lista (band, strip; list), German Leiste (ledge; (heraldry) bar), Icelandic lista, listi, Italian lista (list; strip), Portuguese lista (list), Spanish lista (list, roll; stripe), Swedish lista (list).

NounEdit

list (plural lists)

  1. A strip of fabric, especially from the edge of a piece of cloth.
    • c. 1603–1604, William Shakespeare, “Measvre for Measure”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene ii], lines 27–34, page 62, column 1:
      1. Gent[leman]. Well: there went but a paire of ſheeres betweene vs. / Luc[io]. I grant: as there may betweene the Liſts, and the Veluet. Thou art the Liſt. / 1. Gent. And thou the Veluet. Thou art good Veluet; thou'rt a three pild-piece I warrant thee: I had as liefe be a Lyſt of an Engliſh Kerſey, as be pil'd, as thou art pil'd, for a French Veluet. Do I ſpeake feelingly now?
      1st Gentleman. Well, you and I are cut from the same cloth. / Lucio. I agree: just as the lists [scraps from the edge of the cloth] and the velvet are from the same cloth. You are the list. / 1st Gentleman. And you are the velvet. You are good velvet; you are a three-piled piece, I'll bet. I would willingly be a list of an English kersey, than be full of piles [haemorrhoids], as you are piled, like a French velvet. Do I speak feelingly now?
  2. Material used for cloth selvage.
    • 1871 September 18, “The Jewish New Year”, in The Jewish Herald: A Record of Christian Effort for the Salvation of Israel, London: John Snow & Co., []; and the British Society [for the Propagation of the Gospel Among the Jews], [], published 1 November 1871, OCLC 749304689, page 174:
      Previous to the offering up of prayer, however, the persons chosen for this office [of praying for the people] had divested themselves of their boots and put on list slippers, their hands being washed by "the descendants of Levi" at a basin near the Holy of Holies.
    • 1893, A[rthur] Conan Doyle, “The Naval Treaty”, in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, New York, N.Y.: A. L. Burt, OCLC 691143; republished London: John Murray, [], January 1950, OCLC 632221174, page 255:
      "How is it, then, that the woman who came into the room about nine left to traces with her muddy boots?" / "I am glad you raise the point. It occurred to me at the time. The charwomen are in the habit of taking off their boots at the commissionaire's office, and putting on list slippers."
  3. A register or roll of paper consisting of a compilation or enumeration of a set of possible items; the compilation or enumeration itself. [from 1600]
  4. (in the plural, historical) The barriers or palisades used to fence off a space for jousting or tilting tournaments.
  5. (computing, programming) A codified representation of a list used to store data or in processing; especially, in the LISP programming language, a data structure consisting of a sequence of zero or more items.
  6. (architecture) A little square moulding; a fillet or listel.
  7. (carpentry) A narrow strip of wood, especially sapwood, cut from the edge of a board or plank.
  8. (ropemaking) A piece of woollen cloth with which the yarns are grasped by a worker.
  9. (tin-plate manufacture) The first thin coating of tin; a wire-like rim of tin left on an edge of the plate after it is coated.
  10. (obsolete) A stripe.
    • 1646, Thomas Browne, “Of the Same [i.e., the Blacknesse of Negroes]”, in Pseudodoxia Epidemica: Or, Enquiries into Very Many Received Tenents, and Commonly Presumed Truths, London: Printed for Tho. Harper for Edvvard Dod, OCLC 838860010; Pseudodoxia Epidemica: Or, Enquiries into Very Many Received Tenents, and Commonly Presumed Truths. [], book 6, 2nd corrected and much enlarged edition, London: Printed by A. Miller, for Edw[ard] Dod and Nath. Ekins, [], 1650, OCLC 152706203, page 282:
      Thus the Aſſe having a peculiar mark of a croſſe made by a black liſt down his back, and another athwart, or at right angles down his ſhoulders; common opinion aſcribes this figure unto a peculiar ſignation; ſince that beaſt had the honour to bear our Saviour on his back.
  11. (obsolete) A boundary or limit; a border.
    • c. 1597, [William Shakespeare], The History of Henrie the Fovrth; [], quarto edition, London: Printed by P[eter] S[hort] for Andrew Wise, [], published 1598, OCLC 932916628, [Act IV, scene i]:
      [W]ere it good / [] to ſet ſo rich a maine / On the nice hazard of one doubtfull houre? / It were not good for therein ſhould we read / The very bottome and the ſoule of hope, / The very liſt, the very vtmost bound / Of all our fortunes.
      Is it good / [] to place so high a stake / On the risky hazard of one doubtful hour? / No, it would be no good for we would read into it that we had reached / The end of our hope, / The very limit, the very utmost boundary / Of all our luck.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

list (third-person singular simple present lists, present participle listing, simple past and past participle listed)

  1. (transitive) To create or recite a list.
  2. (transitive) To place in listings.
  3. (transitive) To sew together, as strips of cloth, so as to make a show of colours, or to form a border.
  4. (transitive) To cover with list, or with strips of cloth; to put list on; to stripe as if with list.
    to list a door
  5. (transitive, agriculture) To plough and plant with a lister.
  6. (transitive, agriculture, chiefly Southern US) To prepare (land) for a cotton crop by making alternating beds and alleys with a hoe.
  7. (transitive, carpentry) To cut away a narrow strip, as of sapwood, from the edge of.
    to list a board
  8. (transitive, military) To enclose (a field, etc.) for combat.
  9. (transitive, obsolete) To engage a soldier, etc.; to enlist.
    • 1642 October 28, [Philip Morant], History and Antiquities of the Borough of Colchester, in the County of Essex. [], Colchester, Essex: Printed and sold by I. Marsden, [...], published 1810, OCLC 14454124, pages 48–49:
      [] It is therefore ordered that the Maior and Aldermen of Colchester [et al.], shall forthwith procure and raise in the said severall townes, and other pleces adjacent, two thousand horses for dragooners, or as manie as possible they may, for the service as aforesaid, and with all possible speed to send them up to London unto Thomas Browne Grocer, and Maximilian Beard Girdler, by us appointed to list horses for the service aforesaid; []
    • 1822, [Walter Scott], chapter IV, in Peveril of the Peak. [...] In Four Volumes, volume I, Edinburgh: Printed for Archibald Constable and Co.; London: Hurst, Robinson, and Co., OCLC 2392685, page 107:
      "I have a gun, madam," said little Julian, "and the park-keeper is to teach me how to fire it next year." / "I will list you for my soldier, then," said the Countess.
  10. (intransitive, obsolete) To engage in public service by enrolling one's name; to enlist.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English list, liste (ability, cleverness, cunning, skill; adroitness, dexterity; strategem, trick; device, design, token), from Old English list (art, craft; cleverness, cunning, experience, skill),[2] from Proto-Germanic *listiz (art, craft), from Proto-Indo-European *leys-, *leyǝs- (furrow, trace, track, trail). The word is cognate with Dutch list (artifice, guile, sleight; ruse, strategem), German List (cunning, guile; ploy, ruse, trick), Low German list (artifice, cunning; prudence, wisdom), Icelandic list (art), Saterland Frisian list (cunning, knowledge), Scots list (art, craft, skill; cunning), Swedish list (art; cunning, guile, wile; ruse, trick; stealth), and possibly Spanish listo (clever). It is also related to learn, lere, lore.

NounEdit

list (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Art; craft; cunning; skill.
    • 1877 November 16, “Vaticanism”, in The Literary World. Choice Readings from the Best New Books, and Critical Reviews, volume XVI, number 420 (New Series), London: James Clarke & Co., [], OCLC 221123288, page 313, column 3:
      In discussing the Syllabus and the last dogma of 1870, so much must be allowed for Italian list and cunning, or a word-fence. An Englishman, with his matter-of-fact way of putting things, is no match for these gentry.
    • 1893, S[olomon] C[aesar] Malan, chapter XXVI, in Original Notes on the Book of Proverbs. Mostly from Eastern Writings, volume III (Ch. xxi.–xxxi.), London: Williams and Norgate, [], OCLC 610436370, page 349:
      Sophos, fab[le] 40. "The foxes had heard that the fowls were sick, and went to see them decked in peacock's feathers; said of men who speak friendly, but only with list or cunning within."
    • 1897, Lilian Winser, “Lossenbury Woods”, in Lays and Legends of the Weald of Kent, London: Elkin Mathews, [], OCLC 456507096, page 44:
      For when the guileful monster smiled / Snakes left their holes and hissed,— / And stroking soft his silken beard / Raised creatures full of list.
    • 1990, Alexander L. Ringer, “The Rise of Urban Musical Life between the Revolutions, 1789–1848”, in Alexander [L.] Ringer, editor, The Early Romantic Era: Between Revolutions: 1789 and 1848 (Man and Music; 6), Basingstoke, Hampshire; London: The Macmillan Press, DOI:10.1007/978-1-439-11297-5, →ISBN, figure 13, caption, page 22:
      'The general bass, in its fixed lines, is taken by surprise and overwhelmed by List [[Franz] Liszt]' (List = cunning); anonymous lithograph (c 1842).
    • 1992, Reading Medieval Studies: Annual Proceedings of the Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies in the University of Reading, [Reading, Berkshire]: Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading, ISSN 0950-3129, OCLC 624457645, page 92:
      [Der] Pleier [] provides a 'courtly corrective' to Daniel in the shape of his hero, Garel. The latter wins his fight not by list but through straightforward knightly prowess, []
    • 2000, Jakov Ljubarskij, “John Kinnamos as a Writer”, in Cordula Scholz and Georgios Makris, editors, ΠΟΛΥΠΛΕΥΡΟΣ ΝΟΥΣ [POLYPLEUROS NOUS]: Miscellanea für Peter Schreiner zu seinem 60. Geburtstag [VERSATILE MIND: Miscellanea for Peter Schreiner for His 60th Birthday] (Byzantinisches Archiv [Byzantine Archive]; 19), Munich; Leipzig: K[laus] G[erhard] Saur, →ISBN, footnote 11, page 166:
      It is worth noting that, contrary to Alexios who according to his daughter did not scruple to use any tricks to achieve his goal, Manuel [I Komnenos], as depicted by [John] Kinnamos, preferred "to win by war rather than by list" [].
    • 2008, Jon B. Sherman, The Magician in Medieval German Literature (unpublished Ph.D. dissertation), Urbana; Champaign, Ill.: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, OCLC 695692595:
      One man can accomplish with list (magic), that which a thousand could not accomplish, regardless of how strong they were.
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Clipping of list(en).

VerbEdit

list (third-person singular simple present lists, present participle listing, simple past and past participle list)

  1. (intransitive, poetic) To listen.
  2. (transitive, poetic) To listen to.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Middle English listen, list, liste, leste, lesten (to choose, desire, wish (to do something)), from Old English lystan,[3] from Proto-Germanic *lustijaną, from Proto-Germanic *lustuz (pleasure). The word is cognate with Danish lyste (to desire, feel like, want), Dutch lusten (to appreciate, like; to lust), Faroese lysta (to desire), Old Norse lyste (to desire; to lust), Old High German lusten (modern German gelüsten and lüsten (obsolete)).

The noun sense is from the verb, or from Middle English list, liste, lest, leste (desire, wish; craving, longing; enjoyment, joy, pleasure), which is derived from Middle English listen, list (verb).[4]

VerbEdit

list (third-person singular simple present lists, present participle listing, simple past and past participle listed)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To be pleasing to.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To desire, like, or wish (to do something).
    • 1536–1542, Thomas Wyatt, “That Unkindness hath Slain His Poor True Heart”, in The Poetical Works of Sir Thomas Wyatt, London: William Pickering, published 1831, OCLC 503979158, pages 88–89:
      Who list to live in quietness / By me let him beware. / For I by high disdain / Am made without redress; / And unkindness, alas! hath slain / My poor true heart, all comfortless.
    • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene ii], page 12, column 2:
      If thou beeſt a man, ſhew thy ſelfe in thy likeneſs. If thou beeſt a diuell, take't as thou liſt.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, Conteyning the Old Testament, and the New. [] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, [], OCLC 964384981, John 3:8:
      The winde bloweth where it liſteth, and thou heareſt the ſound thereof, but canſt not tel whence it commeth, and whither it goeth: So is euery one that is borne of the Spirit.
    • 1678, John Bunyan, The Pilgrim’s Progress; [], London: Printed for Nath. Ponder; [], OCLC 228725984; reprinted as The Pilgrim’s Progress (The Noel Douglas Replicas), London: Noel Douglas, [], 1928, OCLC 5190338, page 206:
      What! would you have us truſt to what Chriſt in his own perſon has done without us! This conceit would looſen the reines of our luſt, and tollerate us to live as we liſt: For what matter how we live, if we may be Juſtified by Chriſts perſonal righteouſneſs from all, when we believe it?
    • 1843 April, Thomas Carlyle, “Unworking Aristocracy”, in Past and Present, London: Chapman and Hall, OCLC 924818948; republished New York, N.Y.: William H. Colyer, [], May 1843, OCLC 10193956, book III (The Modern Worker), page 102:
      Ye are as gods, that can create soil. Soil-creating gods there is no withstanding. They have the might to sell wheat at what price they list; and the right, to all lengths, and famine-lengths,—if they be pitiless infernal gods!
    • 1959, Leo Strauss, “What is Political Philosophy?”, in What is Political Philosophy?: And Other Studies, Glencoe, Ill.: The Free Press, OCLC 497094, page 51:
      License consists in doing what one lists; liberty consists in doing in the right manner the good only; and our knowledge of the good must come from a higher principle, from above.
    • 1994, John [Wyon] Burrow, The Historian: The Magazine for Members of the Historical Association, London: The Historical Association, ISSN 0265-1076, OCLC 423924578, page 176, column 2:
      The spirit seemed to blow where it listed among a historically motley collection of Catholic theologians, Puritan zealots and American squires.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

list

  1. (obsolete) Desire, inclination.

Etymology 5Edit

Origin uncertain;[5] possibly from tilting on lists in jousts,[6] or from etymology 4 in the sense of inclining towards what one desires.[7]

NounEdit

list (plural lists)

  1. (architecture) A tilt to a building.
  2. (nautical) A careening or tilting to one side, usually not intentionally or under a vessel's own power. [from early 17th c.]
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

list (third-person singular simple present lists, present participle listing, simple past and past participle listed)

  1. (transitive, nautical) To cause (something) to tilt to one side. [from early 17th c.]
    the steady wind listed the ship
  2. (intransitive, nautical) To tilt to one side. [from early 17th c.]
    the ship listed to port
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ lī̆st(e, n.(2)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 16 June 2018.
  2. ^ list(e, n.(1)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 24 June 2018.
  3. ^ listen, v.(1)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 17 June 2018.
  4. ^ list, n.(2)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 17 June 2018.
  5. ^ list” (US) / “list” (UK) in Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press.
  6. ^ William Long (6 November 2005), “List..the Word II”, in Drbilllong.com[1], archived from the original on 20 April 2012.
  7. ^ list, n. 3” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2018, retrieved 24 June 2018.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *listъ (leaf).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

list m

  1. leaf (green and flat organ of vegetative plants)
  2. letter (written message)
  3. sheet (sheet of paper)
  4. newspaper
    Polský list Dziennik Gazeta Prawna nejdříve napsal, že polská hlava státu podepíše dokument ve středu. (iDNES)
  5. certificate (document containing a certified statement)
    rodný list -- birth certificate
    úmrtní list -- death certificate

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

  • list in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • list in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DanishEdit

NounEdit

list c (singular definite listen, not used in plural form)

  1. cunning, trick

VerbEdit

list

  1. imperative of liste

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch list, from Old Dutch list, from Proto-Germanic *listiz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

list f (plural listen, diminutive listje n)

  1. a cunning plan

AnagramsEdit


FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

list f (genitive singular listar, plural listir)

  1. art

DeclensionEdit

Declension of list
f2 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative list listin listir listirnar
accusative list listina listir listirnar
dative list listini listum listunum
genitive listar listarinnar lista listanna

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

list f (genitive singular listar, nominative plural listir)

  1. art

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Lower SorbianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *listъ (leaf).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

list m (diminutive listk)

  1. leaf, foliage
  2. letter (a written message)

DeclensionEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse list

NounEdit

list m, f (definite singular lista or listen)

  1. cunning, craftiness, slyness

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

list

  1. imperative of liste

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse list

NounEdit

list f (definite singular lista)

  1. cunning, craftiness, slyness

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *listiz. Cognate with Old Saxon list, Dutch list, Old High German list (German List), Old Norse list (Swedish list).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

list f

  1. art; cunning, guile, craft

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse list, from Proto-Germanic *listiz.

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

NounEdit

list f

  1. skill, proficiency
  2. art, craft
  3. cunning, slyness
  4. resort

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *listъ (leaf).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

list m inan (diminutive liścik)

  1. letter (a written message)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • list in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *listъ (leaf).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lȋst m (Cyrillic spelling ли̑ст)

  1. leaf
  2. (computing) leaf
  3. sheet (of paper or other material manufactured in thin sheets)
  4. newsletter, newspaper
  5. certificate (any official document attesting a fact)
  6. (obsolete) letter (written message)
  7. calf (leg part)
  8. sole, flatfish (fish species)

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • list” in Hrvatski jezični portal

SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *listъ (leaf).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

list m (genitive singular listu, lista, nominative plural listy, genitive plural listov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. letter; a written message
  2. leaf; a part of a tree
  3. sheet; a piece of paper

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • list in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *listъ (leaf).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

líst m inan (genitive lísta, nominative plural lísti)

  1. piece of paper
  2. leaf
  3. sole
  4. (anatomy) calf (leg part)

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish list, from Old Norse list, from Proto-Germanic *listiz, from Proto-Indo-European *leys-, *leyǝs-. Cognate with Icelandic list.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

list c

  1. smartness, trick, cunning
  2. a strip (of wood or metal, a thin and long board), a border, a beading
  3. (graphical user interface) a bar

DeclensionEdit

Declension of list 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative list listen lister listerna
Genitive lists listens listers listernas

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


Upper SorbianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *listъ (leaf).

NounEdit

list m

  1. letter