See also: List, līst, лист, and ліст

English edit

The white printed strip is the selvage of a piece of cloth. Such selvage is sometimes made with list (sense 2)
A list (sense 3) of the Roman Catholic popes buried in St. Peter’s Basilica on a plaque at the entrance to the Sacristy

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English lī̆st, lī̆ste (band, stripe; hem, selvage; border, edge, rim; list, specification; barriers enclosing area for jousting, etc.), from Old English līste (hem, edge, strip), or Old French liste, listre (border; band; strip of paper; list), or Medieval Latin lista,[1] all from Proto-West Germanic *līstā, from Proto-Germanic *līstǭ (band, strip; hem, selvage; border, edge), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *leys- (to trace, track). The word is cognate with Saterland Frisian Lieste (margin, strip, list), Dutch lijst (picture frame, list), German Low German Liest (edging, border), German Leiste (strip, rail, ledge; (heraldry) bar), Swedish lista (list), Icelandic lista, listi (list), Italian lista (list; strip), Portuguese lista (list), Spanish lista (list, roll; stripe), Galician lista (band, strip; list), Finnish lista ((informal) list; batten).

Noun edit

list (plural lists)

  1. A strip of fabric, especially from the edge of a piece of cloth.
    • c. 1603–1604 (date written), William Shakespeare, “Measure for Measure”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act I, scene ii], page 62, column 1, lines 27–34:
      1. Gent[leman]. Well: there went but a paire of ſheeres betweene vs. / Luc[io]. I grant: as there may betweene the Liſts, and the Veluet. Thou art the Liſt. / 1. Gent. And thou the Veluet. Thou art good Veluet; thou'rt a three pild-piece I warrant thee: I had as liefe be a Lyſt of an Engliſh Kerſey, as be pil'd, as thou art pil'd, for a French Veluet. Do I ſpeake feelingly now?
      1st Gentleman. Well, you and I are cut from the same cloth. / Lucio. I agree: just as the lists [scraps from the edge of the cloth] and the velvet are from the same cloth. You are the list. / 1st Gentleman. And you are the velvet. You are good velvet; you are a three-piled piece, I'll bet. I would willingly be a list of an English kersey, than be full of piles [haemorrhoids], as you are piled, like a French velvet. Do I speak feelingly now?
    • 1913, Arthur Conan Doyle, “(please specify the page)”, in The Poison Belt [], London; New York, N.Y.: Hodder and Stoughton, →OCLC:
      Why should we not send a message out over London which would attract to us anyone who might still be alive? I ran across, and pulling at the list-covered rope, I was surprised to find how difficult it was to swing the bell.
  2. Material used for cloth selvage.
    • 1871 September 18, “The Jewish New Year”, in The Jewish Herald: A Record of Christian Effort for the Salvation of Israel, London: John Snow & Co., []; and the British Society [for the Propagation of the Gospel Among the Jews], [], published 1 November 1871, →OCLC, page 174:
      Previous to the offering up of prayer, however, the persons chosen for this office [of praying for the people] had divested themselves of their boots and put on list slippers, their hands being washed by "the descendants of Levi" at a basin near the Holy of Holies.
    • 1893, A[rthur] Conan Doyle, “The Naval Treaty”, in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, New York, N.Y.: A. L. Burt, →OCLC; republished London: John Murray, [], January 1950, →OCLC, page 255:
      "How is it, then, that the woman who came into the room about nine left to traces with her muddy boots?" / "I am glad you raise the point. It occurred to me at the time. The charwomen are in the habit of taking off their boots at the commissionaire's office, and putting on list slippers."
  3. A register or roll of paper consisting of a compilation or enumeration of a set of possible items; the compilation or enumeration itself. [from 1600]
    • 1625, Francis [Bacon], “Of Youth and Age. XLII.”, in The Essayes [], 3rd edition, London: [] Iohn Haviland for Hanna Barret, →OCLC, pages 247–248:
      Natures that haue much Heat, and great and violent deſires and Perturbations, are not ripe for Action, till they haue paſſed the Meridian of their yeares: As it was with Iulius Cæſar, and Septimius Seuerus. [] And yet he [Septimus Severus] was the Ableſt Emperour, almoſt, of all the Liſt.
    • 1843 December 19, Charles Dickens, “Stave I. Marley’s Ghost.”, in A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas, London: Chapman & Hall, [], →OCLC, pages 11–12:
      "Scrooge and Marley's, I believe," said one of the gentlemen, referring to his list. "Have I the pleasure of addressing Mr. Scrooge, or Mr. Marley?"
    • 2013 June 29, “A punch in the gut: How microbes promote liver cancer in the overweight”, in The Economist[2], volume 407, number 8842, pages 72–73:
      Mostly, the microbiome is beneficial. [] Research over the past few years, however, has implicated it in diseases from atherosclerosis to asthma to autism. Dr Yoshimoto and his colleagues would like to add liver cancer to that list.
  4. (in the plural, historical) The barriers or palisades used to fence off a space for jousting or tilting tournaments.
  5. (in the plural, military, historical) The scene of a military contest; the ground or field of combat; an enclosed space that serves as a battlefield; the site of a pitched battle.
    • 1862, John Williamson Palmer, Stonewall Jackson's Way :
      The sun’s bright lances rout the mists of morning, and by George! Here’s Longstreet struggling in the lists, hemmed in an ugly gorge. Pope and his Yankees, whipped before, “Bay’nets and grape!” hear Stonewall roar; “Charge, Stuart! Pay off Ashby’s score!” in “Stonewall Jackson’s Way.”
  6. (computing, programming) A codified representation of a list used to store data or in processing; especially, in the Lisp programming language, a data structure consisting of a sequence of zero or more items.
    • 1985 March 10, Ed Acly, “A Tale of Three Languages: C, Ada & Lisp”, in Computerworld: The Newsweekly for the Computer Community, volume XIX, number 12, Framingham, Mass.: CW Communications, →ISSN, →OCLC, page ID/10, columns 1–2:
      Lisp is an applicative language. This means that it is structured around applying functions (operations) to a linked list of arguments that accompany those functions. [] A function call or function definition is only coded in the syntax of a list, which can be of an indefinite length. Thus, the list is the only data structure for a Lisp program.
  7. (architecture) A little square moulding; a fillet or listel.
    • 1788, [John Carter], “STRIÆ”, in The Builder’s Magazine: Or, A Universal Dictionary for Architects, Carpenters, Masons, Bricklayers, &c. [], new edition, London: Printed for E. Newbery, [], →OCLC, page 284:
      STRIÆ, in ancient architecture, the liſts, fillets or rays which ſeparate the ſtriges or flutings of columns.
    • 1876, Edward Shaw, Thomas W[illiam] Silloway, George M[ilford] Harding, “Introduction”, in Civil Architecture; being a Complete Theoretical and Practical System of Building, Containing the Fundamental Principles of the Art. [], 11th edition, Philadelphia, Pa.: Henry Carey Baird & Co., [], →OCLC, page 22, column 2:
      A volute is a kind of spiral scroll, used in the Ionic and Composite capitals, of which it makes the principal characteristic and ornament. [] There are several diversities practised in the volute. In some, the list or edge, throughout all the circumvolutions, is in the same line or plane. [] [I]n others, the canal or one circumvolution is detached from the list of another by a vacuity or aperture.
  8. (carpentry) A narrow strip of wood, especially sapwood, cut from the edge of a board or plank.
  9. (ropemaking) A piece of woollen cloth with which the yarns are grasped by a worker.
  10. (tin-plate manufacture) The first thin coating of tin; a wire-like rim of tin left on an edge of the plate after it is coated.
  11. (obsolete) A stripe.
    • 1650, Thomas Browne, “Of the Same [i.e., the Blacknesse of Negroes]”, in Pseudodoxia Epidemica: [], 2nd edition, London: [] A[braham] Miller, for Edw[ard] Dod and Nath[aniel] Ekins, [], →OCLC, 6th book, page 282:
      Thus the Aſſe having a peculiar mark of a croſſe made by a black liſt down his back, and another athwart, or at right angles down his ſhoulders; common opinion aſcribes this figure unto a peculiar ſignation; ſince that beaſt had the honour to bear our Saviour on his back.
  12. (obsolete) A boundary or limit; a border.
    • c. 1597 (date written), [William Shakespeare], The History of Henrie the Fourth; [], quarto edition, London: [] P[eter] S[hort] for Andrew Wise, [], published 1598, →OCLC, [Act IV, scene i]:
      [W]ere it good / [] to ſet ſo rich a maine / On the nice hazard of one doubtfull houre? / It were not good for therein ſhould we read / The very bottome and the ſoule of hope, / The very liſt, the very vtmost bound / Of all our fortunes.
      Is it good / [] to place so high a stake / On the risky hazard of one doubtful hour? / No, it would be no good for we would read into it that we had reached / The end of our hope, / The very limit, the very utmost boundary / Of all our luck.
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Collocations edit
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb edit

list (third-person singular simple present lists, present participle listing, simple past and past participle listed)

  1. (transitive) To create or recite a list.
  2. (transitive) To place in listings.
    • 1993, Ooi Jin Bee, “The Tropical Rain Forest: Patterns of Exploitation and Trade”, in Tropical Deforestation: The Tyranny of Time, Singapore: Singapore University Press, →ISBN, page 62:
      As the export market for tropical hardwoods expanded, timber from tropical rain forests very rapidly became the dominant or major forest product, dominant to such an extent that trade figures often do not even list the minor forest products exported, or their value.
  3. (transitive) To sew together, as strips of cloth, so as to make a show of colours, or to form a border.
  4. (transitive) To cover with list, or with strips of cloth; to put list on; to stripe as if with list.
    to list a door
  5. (transitive, agriculture) To plough and plant with a lister.
  6. (transitive, agriculture, chiefly Southern US) To prepare (land) for a cotton crop by making alternating beds and alleys with a hoe.
  7. (transitive, carpentry) To cut away a narrow strip, as of sapwood, from the edge of.
    to list a board
  8. (transitive, military) To enclose (a field, etc.) for combat.
  9. (transitive, obsolete) To engage a soldier, etc.; to enlist.
    • 1642 October 28, [Philip Morant], History and Antiquities of the Borough of Colchester, in the County of Essex. [], Colchester, Essex: Printed and sold by I. Marsden, [...], published 1810, →OCLC, pages 48–49:
      [] It is therefore ordered that the Maior and Aldermen of Colchester [et al.], shall forthwith procure and raise in the said severall townes, and other pleces adjacent, two thousand horses for dragooners, or as manie as possible they may, for the service as aforesaid, and with all possible speed to send them up to London unto Thomas Browne Grocer, and Maximilian Beard Girdler, by us appointed to list horses for the service aforesaid; []
    • 1822, [Walter Scott], chapter IV, in Peveril of the Peak. [], volume I, Edinburgh: [] Archibald Constable and Co.; London: Hurst, Robinson, and Co., →OCLC, page 107:
      "I have a gun, madam," said little Julian, "and the park-keeper is to teach me how to fire it next year." / "I will list you for my soldier, then," said the Countess.
  10. (intransitive, obsolete) To engage in public service by enrolling one's name; to enlist.
  11. To give a building of architectural or historical interest listed status; see also the adjective listed.
    • 2021 February 15, Robin Leleux, “Awards honour the best restoration projects: The London Underground Operational Enhancement Award: Hanwell”, in RAIL, number 946, page 55:
      A century later, BR demolished the downside main buildings, so the eastbound and central platforms were promptly listed - which has ensured their survival, albeit increasingly neglected in recent years. This has now been rectified, [...].
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Terms derived from list (verb)
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English list, liste (ability, cleverness, cunning, skill; adroitness, dexterity; strategem, trick; device, design, token), from Old English list (art, craft; cleverness, cunning, experience, skill),[2] from Proto-West Germanic *listi, from Proto-Germanic *listiz (art, craft), from Proto-Indo-European *leys-, *leyǝs- (furrow, trace, track, trail). The word is cognate with Dutch list (artifice, guile, sleight; ruse, strategem), German List (cunning, guile; ploy, ruse, trick), Low German list (artifice, cunning; prudence, wisdom), Icelandic list (art), Saterland Frisian list (cunning, knowledge), Scots list (art, craft, skill; cunning), Swedish list (art; cunning, guile, wile; ruse, trick; stealth), and possibly Spanish listo (clever). It is also related to learn, lore.

Noun edit

list (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Art; craft; cunning; skill.
    • 1877 November 16, “Vaticanism”, in The Literary World. Choice Readings from the Best New Books, and Critical Reviews, volume XVI, number 420 (New Series), London: James Clarke & Co., [], →OCLC, page 313, column 3:
      In discussing the Syllabus and the last dogma of 1870, so much must be allowed for Italian list and cunning, or a word-fence. An Englishman, with his matter-of-fact way of putting things, is no match for these gentry.
    • 1893, S[olomon] C[aesar] Malan, chapter XXVI, in Original Notes on the Book of Proverbs. Mostly from Eastern Writings, volumes III (Ch. xxi.–xxxi.), London: Williams and Norgate, [], →OCLC, page 349:
      Sophos, fab[le] 40. "The foxes had heard that the fowls were sick, and went to see them decked in peacock's feathers; said of men who speak friendly, but only with list or cunning within."
    • 1897, Lilian Winser, “Lossenbury Woods”, in Lays and Legends of the Weald of Kent, London: Elkin Mathews, [], →OCLC, page 44:
      For when the guileful monster smiled / Snakes left their holes and hissed,— / And stroking soft his silken beard / Raised creatures full of list.
    • 1990, Alexander L. Ringer, “The Rise of Urban Musical Life between the Revolutions, 1789–1848”, in Alexander [L.] Ringer, editor, The Early Romantic Era: Between Revolutions: 1789 and 1848 (Man and Music; 6), Basingstoke, Hampshire, London: The Macmillan Press, →DOI, →ISBN, figure 13, caption, page 22:
      'The general bass, in its fixed lines, is taken by surprise and overwhelmed by List [[Franz] Liszt]' (List = cunning); anonymous lithograph (c 1842).
    • 1992, Reading Medieval Studies: Annual Proceedings of the Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies in the University of Reading, [Reading, Berkshire]: Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading, →ISSN, →OCLC, page 92:
      [Der] Pleier [] provides a 'courtly corrective' to Daniel in the shape of his hero, Garel. The latter wins his fight not by list but through straightforward knightly prowess, []
    • 2000, Jakov Ljubarskij, “John Kinnamos as a Writer”, in Cordula Scholz, Georgios Makris, editors, ΠΟΛΥΠΛΕΥΡΟΣ ΝΟΥΣ [POLYPLEUROS NOUS]: Miscellanea für Peter Schreiner zu seinem 60. Geburtstag [VERSATILE MIND: Miscellanea for Peter Schreiner for His 60th Birthday] (Byzantinisches Archiv [Byzantine Archive]; 19), Munich, Leipzig: K[laus] G[erhard] Saur, →ISBN, footnote 11, page 166:
      It is worth noting that, contrary to Alexios who according to his daughter did not scruple to use any tricks to achieve his goal, Manuel [I Komnenos], as depicted by [John] Kinnamos, preferred "to win by war rather than by list" [].
    • 2008, Jon B. Sherman, The Magician in Medieval German Literature (unpublished Ph.D. dissertation), Urbana, Champaign, Ill.: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, →OCLC:
      One man can accomplish with list (magic), that which a thousand could not accomplish, regardless of how strong they were.
Synonyms edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Middle English listen, from Old English hlystan (to listen), from hlyst (hearing), from Proto-West Germanic *hlusti, from Proto-Germanic *hlustiz (hearing).

Verb edit

list (third-person singular simple present lists, present participle listing, simple past and past participle list)

  1. (intransitive, poetic) To listen.
  2. (transitive, poetic) To listen to.
Translations edit

Etymology 4 edit

From Middle English listen, list, liste, leste, lesten (to choose, desire, wish (to do something)), from Old English lystan,[3] from Proto-West Germanic *lustijan, from Proto-Germanic *lustijaną, from Proto-Germanic *lustuz (pleasure). The word is cognate with Saterland Frisian läste (to wish for, desire, crave), West Frisian lêste (to like, desire), Dutch lusten (to appreciate, like; to lust), German lüsten, gelüsten (to desire, want, crave), Danish lyste (to desire, feel like, want), Faroese lysta (to desire).

The noun sense is from the verb, or from Middle English list, liste, lest, leste (desire, wish; craving, longing; enjoyment, joy, pleasure), which is derived from Middle English listen, list (verb).[4]

Verb edit

list (third-person singular simple present lists, present participle listing, simple past and past participle listed)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To desire, like, or wish (to do something).
  2. (transitive, archaic) To be pleasing to.
    • 2016, Graydon Saunders, chapter 13, in Safely You Deliver:
      Might then I depart, and dwell as listeth me, out of all the world?
Translations edit

Noun edit

list

  1. (obsolete) Desire, inclination.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 5 edit

Uncertain;[5] possibly from tilting on lists in jousts,[6] or from Etymology 4 in the sense of inclining towards what one desires.[7]

Noun edit

list (plural lists)

  1. (architecture) A tilt to a building.
  2. (nautical) A careening or tilting to one side, usually not intentionally or under a vessel's own power. [from early 17th c.]
Translations edit

Verb edit

list (third-person singular simple present lists, present participle listing, simple past and past participle listed)

  1. (transitive, nautical) To cause (something) to tilt to one side. [from early 17th c.]
    the steady wind listed the ship
  2. (intransitive, nautical) To tilt to one side. [from early 17th c.]
    the ship listed to port
    • 2000, Bob Foster, Birdum or Bust!, Henley Beach, SA: Seaview Press, page 173:
      Even a small camber one way caused the whole outfit to list alarmingly.
Translations edit

References edit

  1. ^ lī̆st(e, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 16 June 2018.
  2. ^ list(e, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 24 June 2018.
  3. ^ listen, v.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 17 June 2018.
  4. ^ list, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 17 June 2018.
  5. ^ list”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.
  6. ^ William Long (6 November 2005), “List..the Word II”, in Drbilllong.com[1], archived from the original on 2012-04-20.
  7. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2024), “list, n. 3”, in Online Etymology Dictionary, retrieved 24 June 2018.

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Chinese edit

Etymology edit

From English list.

Pronunciation edit


  • Also pronounced as IPA(key): /lɪs⁵⁵/

Noun edit

list

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) list; enumeration or compilation of items; the paper or document of which the list is written or printed on (Classifier: c;  c;  c)

Verb edit

list

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) to list; to create a list of items

Czech edit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Czech list, from Proto-Slavic *listъ (leaf).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

list m inan

  1. leaf (green and flat organ of vegetative plants)
  2. (archaic) letter (written message)
    Synonyms: dopis, psaní
  3. sheet (sheet of paper)
  4. newspaper
    Polský list Dziennik Gazeta Prawna nejdříve napsal, že polská hlava státu podepíše dokument ve středu. (iDNES)
  5. certificate (document containing a certified statement)
    rodný listbirth certificate
    úmrtní listdeath certificate

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

  • list in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • list in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • list in Internetová jazyková příručka

Danish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlesd/, [ˈle̝st]

Noun edit

list c (singular definite listen, not used in plural form)

  1. cunning, trick

Verb edit

list

  1. imperative of liste

References edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch list, from Old Dutch list, from Proto-Germanic *listiz.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

list f (plural listen, diminutive listje n)

  1. a cunning plan, a ruse, a trick

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Afrikaans: lis
  • Negerhollands: list

Anagrams edit

Faroese edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

list f (genitive singular listar, plural listir)

  1. art

Declension edit

Declension of list
f2 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative list listin listir listirnar
accusative list listina listir listirnar
dative list listini listum listunum
genitive listar listarinnar lista listanna

Icelandic edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse list, from Proto-Germanic *listiz.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

list f (genitive singular listar, nominative plural listir)

  1. art
    Þetta er ekki list!
    That's not art!
  2. skill
    Hann bjó til brúðkaupstertu af mikilli list
    he made a wedding tart with great skill

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Lower Sorbian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *listъ (leaf).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

list m (diminutive listk)

  1. leaf, foliage
  2. letter (a written message)

Declension edit

Masurian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Polish list.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈlist]
  • Syllabification: list

Noun edit

list m inan (diminutive listek)

  1. (chiefly in the plural, sometimes collective) leaf (part of a plant)
  2. letter (written or printed communication)

Further reading edit

  • Zofia Stamirowska (1987-2021), “45”, in Anna Basara, editor, Słownik gwar Ostródzkiego, Warmii i Mazur, Zakład Narodowy im. Ossolińskich Wydawnictwo Polskiej Akademii Nauk, →ISBN, page 4

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse list.

Noun edit

list m or f (definite singular lista or listen)

  1. cunning, craftiness, slyness
  2. skirting board

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

list

  1. imperative of liste

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse list.

Noun edit

list f (definite singular lista)

  1. cunning, craftiness, slyness

References edit

Old Czech edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *lȋstъ.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

list m inan

  1. leaf (part of a plant)
  2. sheet; page (flat, thin piece of parchment n. other material intended for writing)
  3. (biblical) phylactery (box with scrolls of Old Testament quotations, attached by Jews to the forehead n. to the forearm during prayer)
  4. letter (written or printed communication)
  5. (administration) letter; deed (administrative document authorizing something n. testifying to something)
  6. (anatomy) uvula
  7. letter (character of writing)
  8. sheet, place; slice (long piece of i.e. metal)
  9. (singular only) plates (protective clothing of the upper part of the torso)

Declension edit

Descendants edit

References edit

Old English edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *listi. Cognate with Old Saxon list, Dutch list, Old High German list (German List), Old Norse list (Swedish list).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

list m or f

  1. art; cunning, guile, craft

Declension edit

Descendants edit

Old Polish edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *lȋstъ. First attested in the 14th century.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): (10th–15th CE) /lʲist/
  • IPA(key): (15th CE) /lʲist/

Noun edit

list m (related adjective listowy)

  1. leaf (part of a plant)
    • 1939 [end of the 14th century], Ryszard Ganszyniec, Witold Taszycki, Stefan Kubica, Ludwik Bernacki, editors, Psałterz florjański łacińsko-polsko-niemiecki [Latin-Polish-German Florian Psalter]‎[4], Zakład Narodowy imienia Ossolińskich, z zasiłkiem Sejmu Śląskiego [The Ossoliński National Institute: with the benefit of the Silesian Parliament], pages 1, 4:
      A bødze (sc. mąż) iaco drzewo, iesz szczepono iest podlug czekøcych wod..., a list iego ne spadne (folium eius non defluet)
      [A będzie (sc. mąż) jako drzewo, jeż szczepiono jest podług ciekących wod..., a list jego nie spadnie (folium eius non defluet)]
    • 1930 [Fifteenth century], “Gen”, in Ludwik Bernacki, editor, Biblia królowej Zofii (Biblia szaroszpatacka)[5], 8, 11:
      Genze (sc. gołąbek) *szo zaszø wroczyl s olywowim zzelonim listem w swich vszczyech (portans ramum olivae virentibus foliis in ore suo)
      [Jenże (sc. gołąbek) się zasię wrocił s oliwowym z zielonym listem w swych uściech (portans ramum olivae virentibus foliis in ore suo)]
    • 1930 [Fifteenth century], “Lev”, in Ludwik Bernacki, editor, Biblia królowej Zofii (Biblia szaroszpatacka)[6], 23, 40:
      Weszmyecze sobye... lyst palmovi (spatulas palmarum) a rosgy z drzewa gøstich latorosly
      [Weźmiecie sobie... list palmowy (spatulas palmarum), a rozgi z drzewa gęstych latorośli]
    • 1878-1889 [1487], Archiwum Komisji Historycznej[7], volume III, page 350:
      Te... stirpi Godzambą... aggregamus... In cuius signum... tibi... largimur tres pinus... in scuto seu campo flaueo, galea vero in inferiori parte listi supertecta
      [Te... stirpi Godzięba... aggregamus... In cuius signum... tibi... largimur tres pinus... in scuto seu campo flaueo, galea vero in inferiori parte listy supertecta]
  2. letter (written correspondance)
  3. (law) legal document (something that establishes or confirms something)
    • 1959 [1390], Henryk Kowalewicz, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz, editors, Wielkopolskie roty sądowe XIV-XV wieku, Roty poznańskie, volume I, number 79:
      [J]akom przi tem bil, isz Micolay slubil mi list [wro]czicz, isz gim sze zaluge
      [[J]akom przy tem był, iż Mikołaj ślubił mi list [wro]cić, iż jim sie żałuje]
    • c. 1500, Wokabularz lubiński, inkunabuł Archiwum Archidiecezjalnego w Gnieźnie, sygn. Inc. 78d., page 136r:
      Tenor obmya obmavyanye Inde dicimus: Tenore presencium obmavyanym nynyeschych lystow vel podlvg vylozenya nynyeyschych lystow
      [-]
    • c. 1500, Wokabularz lubiński, inkunabuł Archiwum Archidiecezjalnego w Gnieźnie, sygn. Inc. 78d., page 65r:
      Inclusiue computando a data presencium lato pyrzve y poslednye lyczacz od vydanya thego tho lysthą
      [-]
  4. sheet (piece of paper)
    • 1930 [Fifteenth century], “Tob”, in Ludwik Bernacki, editor, Biblia królowej Zofii (Biblia szaroszpatacka)[10], 7, 16:
      Wszøw (sc. Raguel) lyst, podle tego tedi prawa vcziny zapys malzenski (accepta charta fecerunt conscriptionem coniugii)
      [Wziąw (sc. Raguel) list, podle tego tedy prawa uczyni zapis małżeński (accepta charta fecerunt conscriptionem coniugii)]

Derived terms edit

adjectives
nouns

Descendants edit

References edit

Old Slovak edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *lȋstъ. First attested in 1407.

Noun edit

list m inan

  1. leaf (part of a plant)
  2. scale; petal
  3. sheet (rectangular piece of paper intended for writing)
  4. letter (written message addressed to a person, office, institution)
  5. (administration, law) official document
  6. sheet (material on which things are fixed)
  7. thin plate or sheet (piece of i.e. metal)

Descendants edit

References edit

  • Majtán, Milan et al., editors (1991–2008), “list”, in Historický slovník slovenského jazyka [Historical Dictionary of the Slovak Language] (in Slovak), volume 1–7 (A – Ž), Bratislava: VEDA, →OCLC

Old Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse list, from Proto-Germanic *listiz.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

list f

  1. skill, proficiency
  2. art, craft
  3. cunning, slyness
  4. resort

Declension edit

Descendants edit

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old Polish list. Sense 3 was displaced by liść.

Noun edit

list m inan (diminutive liścik, related adjective listowy)

  1. letter (written or printed communication)
  2. letter (paper on which such a communication is written)
  3. (obsolete) leaf (part of a plant)
  4. (obsolete) petal; slice; plaque; layer (long, flat piece of something)
    1. (Middle Polish) sheet (long, flat piece of paper)
  5. (obsolete, in the plural) leaves (pages of a book)
  6. (obsolete) paper tracking financial interest
  7. (Middle Polish) The meaning of this term is uncertain.
    • 1551, S. Murzynowski, Ortografija polska[11], page B2v:
      1 láſka leży/ liſty/ liſzka.
Declension edit
Derived terms edit
nouns

Trivia edit

According to Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej (1990), list is one of the most used words in Polish, appearing 10 times in scientific texts, 18 times in news, 18 times in essays, 31 times in fiction, and 32 times in plays, each out of a corpus of 100,000 words, totaling 109 times, making it the 567th most common word in a corpus of 500,000 words.[1]

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun edit

list f

  1. genitive plural of lista

References edit

  1. ^ Ida Kurcz (1990), “list”, in Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej [Frequency dictionary of the Polish language] (in Polish), volume 1, Kraków; Warszawa: Polska Akademia Nauk. Instytut Języka Polskiego, page 220

Further reading edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Old Church Slavonic листъ (listŭ).

Noun edit

list n (plural listuri)

  1. (obsolete) leaf, page

Declension edit

References edit

  • list in Academia Română, Micul dicționar academic, ediția a II-a, Bucharest: Univers Enciclopedic, 2010. →ISBN

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *listъ (leaf).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

lȋst m (Cyrillic spelling ли̑ст, diminutive lìstić)

  1. leaf
    Synonym: lȉska
  2. (computing) leaf
  3. sheet (of paper or other material manufactured in thin sheets)
  4. a special purpose certificate (any official document attesting a fact, e.g. of birth, ownership etc.)
  5. newsletter, newspaper
  6. (obsolete) letter (written message)
  7. calf (leg part)
  8. sole, flatfish (fish species)
  9. (card games) leaves

Declension edit

Related terms edit

See also edit

German suits in Serbo-Croatian · njemačke boje, nemačke boje, mađarske boje (layout · text)
       
crvena, srce bundeva, tikva zelena, zelje, list žir

References edit

  • list” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Silesian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Polish list.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlist/
  • Rhymes: -ist
  • Syllabification: list

Noun edit

list m inan (diminutive listek)

  1. letter (written or printed communication)
    Synonyms: brif, pismo
  2. document
    Synonyms: akt, dokumynt, papiōr, świadectwo, zaświadczynie

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

nouns

Further reading edit

Slovak edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Slovak list, from Proto-Slavic *listъ (leaf).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

list m inan (genitive singular listu, lista, nominative plural listy, genitive plural listov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. letter; a written message
  2. leaf; a part of a tree
  3. sheet; a piece of paper

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • list”, in Slovníkový portál Jazykovedného ústavu Ľ. Štúra SAV [Dictionary portal of the Ľ. Štúr Institute of Linguistics, Slovak Academy of Science] (in Slovak), https://slovnik.juls.savba.sk, 2024

Slovene edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *listъ (leaf).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

lȋst m inan

  1. piece of paper
  2. leaf
  3. sole
  4. (anatomy) calf (leg part)

Inflection edit

 
The diacritics used in this section of the entry are non-tonal. If you are a native tonal speaker, please help by adding the tonal marks.
Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. líst
gen. sing. lísta
singular dual plural
nominative
(imenovȃlnik)
líst lísta lísti
genitive
(rodȋlnik)
lísta lístov lístov
dative
(dajȃlnik)
lístu lístoma lístom
accusative
(tožȋlnik)
líst lísta líste
locative
(mẹ̑stnik)
lístu lístih lístih
instrumental
(orọ̑dnik)
lístom lístoma lísti

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • list”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran
  • list”, in Termania, Amebis
  • See also the general references

Swedish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Swedish list, from Old Norse list, from Proto-Germanic *listiz, from Proto-Indo-European *leys-, *leyǝs-. Cognate with Icelandic list.

Noun edit

list c

  1. smartness, trick, cunning
Declension edit
Declension of list 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative list listen lister listerna
Genitive lists listens listers listernas
Related terms edit

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Swedish lista, probably from Middle Low German lîste, from Old Saxon *līsta, from Proto-West Germanic *līstā, from Proto-Germanic *līstǭ. Cognate with Danish liste, Icelandic lista.

Noun edit

list c

  1. a long, thin strip (of wood (or metal or the like), to conceal a joint (or for isolation or decoration), like for example a thin and long board), a border, a beading, edging
  2. (graphical user interface) a bar
Declension edit
Declension of list 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative list listen lister listerna
Genitive lists listens listers listernas
Derived terms edit

See also edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Upper Sorbian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Slavic *listъ (leaf).

Noun edit

list m

  1. letter

Further reading edit

  • list” in Soblex