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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, borrowed from Old French malice, from Latin malitia (badness, bad quality, ill-will, spite), from malus (bad).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: măl'ĭs, IPA(key): /ˈmælɪs/
  • (file)

NounEdit

malice (usually uncountable, plural malices)

  1. Intention to harm or deprive in an illegal or immoral way. Desire to take pleasure in another's misfortune.
    • 1981, Philip K. Dick, Valis, →ISBN, page 67:
      [] not only was there no gratitude (which he could psychologically handle) but downright malice showed itself instead.
  2. (law) An intention to do injury to another party, which in many jurisdictions is a distinguishing factor between the crimes of murder and manslaughter.
 Malice (law) on Wikipedia

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From malico +‎ -e.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /maˈlit͡se/
  • Hyphenation: ma‧lic‧e
  • Rhymes: -it͡se

AdverbEdit

malice

  1. maliciously

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Old French malice, borrowed from Latin malitia.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

malice f (plural malices)

  1. mischief
  2. malice

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin malitia.

NounEdit

malice f (oblique plural malices, nominative singular malice, nominative plural malices)

  1. malice, evilness, evil intentions
  2. malicious act

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit