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See also: Mandragora and mandrágora

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin mandragora, from Latin mandragorās.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌmænˈdɹæɡ.ə.ɹə/

NounEdit

mandragora (countable and uncountable, plural mandragoras)

  1. Mandrake; often specifically mandrake root, traditionally used as a narcotic.
    • 1933, H.L. Mencken, “The Coolidge Mystery”, in H.L. Mencken On Politics[1], published 1996, ISBN 0801853427, page 136:
      The worst fodder for a President is not poppy and mandragora, but strychnine and adrenalin.
  2. A kind of tiny dragon immune to fire.

SynonymsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

mandragora f (plural mandragore)

  1. mandrake

SynonymsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

mandragorā

  1. ablative singular of mandragorās
  2. vocative singular of mandragorās

ReferencesEdit

  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “mandragora”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre

Old SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin mandragorān, accusative of mandragorās, from Ancient Greek μανδραγόρας (mandragóras).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [mãnˈdɾa.ɡo.ɾa]

NounEdit

mandragora f (plural mandragoras)

  1. mandrake
    • Et ſu uertud ſe mueſtra contra los otros toſſicos. ſi non contra aquellos que naſcen de tierra. por que ſon de natura frios. aſſi como mandragoras. o bellinno, o otras coſas que ſon daquella natura.
      And its virtue is shown against the other poisons, those that sprout from the earth, because they are cold by nature; such as mandrakes, or henbane or other things of that nature.

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

 
mandragora

NounEdit

mandragora f

  1. mandrake (plant)

DeclensionEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mandrǎɡora/
  • Hyphenation: man‧dra‧go‧ra

NounEdit

mandràgora f (Cyrillic spelling мандра̀гора)

  1. mandrake

DeclensionEdit