See also: Mandragora and mandrágora

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mandragora.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌmæn.dɹəˈgɔ.ɹə/

NounEdit

mandragora ‎(countable and uncountable, plural mandragoras)

  1. Mandrake; often specifically mandrake root, traditionally used as a narcotic.
    • 1933, H.L. Mencken, “The Coolidge Mystery”, in H.L. Mencken On Politics[1], published 1996, ISBN 0801853427, page 136:
      The worst fodder for a President is not poppy and mandragora, but strychnine and adrenalin.
  2. A kind of tiny dragon immune to fire.

SynonymsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

mandragora f ‎(plural mandragore)

  1. mandrake

SynonymsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

mandragorā

  1. ablative singular of mandragorās
  2. vocative singular of mandragorās

ReferencesEdit


Old SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin mandragorān, accusative of mandragorās, from Ancient Greek μανδραγόρας ‎(mandragóras).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [mãnˈdɾa.ɡo.ɾa]

NounEdit

mandragora f (plural mandragoras)

  1. mandrake
    • Et ſu uertud ſe mueſtra contra los otros toſſicos. ſi non contra aquellos que naſcen de tierra. por que ſon de natura frios. aſſi como mandragoras. o bellinno, o otras coſas que ſon daquella natura.
      And its virtue is shown against the other poisons, those that sprout from the earth, because they are cold by nature; such as mandrakes, or henbane or other things of that nature.

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

mandragora

NounEdit

mandragora f

  1. mandrake (plant)

DeclensionEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mandrǎɡora/
  • Hyphenation: man‧dra‧go‧ra

NounEdit

mandràgora f ‎(Cyrillic spelling мандра̀гора)

  1. mandrake

DeclensionEdit

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