narcotic

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French narcotique, from Medieval Latin narcoticum, from Ancient Greek ναρκόω (narkóō, Ι benumb), from νάρκη (nárkē, numbness, torpor).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

narcotic (plural narcotics)

  1. (pharmacology) Any substance or drug that reduces pain, induces sleep and may alter mood or behaviour; in some contexts, especially in reference to the opiates-and-opioids class, especially in reference to illegal drugs, and often both.
    • 1912, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Lost World[1]:
      "Real San Juan Colorado," he said. "Excitable people like you are the better for narcotics. Heavens! don't bite it! Cut - and cut with reverence!"
  2. Any type of numbing or soothing drug.
    • 1938, Norman Lindsay, Age of Consent, Sydney: Ure Smith, published 1962, page 139:
      Podson grabbed at his tobacco with a fervent, "God! just about saved my life." With a cigarette going he grabbed at the papers, requiring spiritual sustenance as well as a divine narcotic.

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AdjectiveEdit

narcotic (comparative more narcotic, superlative most narcotic)

  1. Of, or relating to narcotics.
  2. (pharmacology) Inducing sleep; causing narcosis.

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RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

French narcotique.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

narcotic m or n (feminine singular narcotică, masculine plural narcotici, feminine and neuter plural narcotice)

  1. narcotic

DeclensionEdit

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NounEdit

narcotic n (plural narcotice)

  1. narcotic

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Related termsEdit