fantasy

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French fantasie (fantasy), from Latin phantasia (imagination), from Ancient Greek φαντασία (phantasía, apparition). Doublet of fancy, fantasia, phantasia, and phantasy.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfæntəsi/
  • (file)

NounEdit

fantasy (countable and uncountable, plural fantasies)

  1. That which comes from one's imagination.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, Hamlet, London, Act 1, Scene 1:
      Is not this something more than fantasy?
    • 1634, John Milton, Comus:
      A thousand fantasies / Begin to throng into my memory.
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure[1]:
      The whole position was so tremendous and so absolutely unearthly, that I believe it actually lulled our sense of terror, but to this hour I often see it in my dreams, and at its mere phantasy wake up covered with cold sweat.
  2. (literature) The literary genre generally dealing with themes of magic and the supernatural, imaginary worlds and creatures, etc.
  3. A fantastical design.
  4. (slang) The drug gamma-hydroxybutyric acid.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Czech: fantasy
  • French: fantasy
  • German: Fantasy
  • Malay: fantasi
  • Polish: fantasy
  • Swahili: fantasia

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

fantasy (third-person singular simple present fantasies, present participle fantasying, simple past and past participle fantasied)

  1. (literary, psychoanalysis) To fantasize (about).
    • 2013, Mark J. Blechner, Hope and Mortality: Psychodynamic Approaches to AIDS and HIV:
      Perhaps I would be able to help him recapture the well-being and emotional closeness he fantasied his brother had experienced with his parents prior to his birth.
  2. (obsolete) To have a fancy for; to be pleased with; to like.
    • 1641, George Cavendish, Thomas Wolsey, Late Cardinall, his Lyffe and Deathe
      The kyng fantasied so much his daughter Anne that almost everything began to grow out of frame and good order
    • 1518, Thomas More; Robynson, transl., Utopia, published 1551:
      Which he doth most fantasy.
  3. (transitive) To imagine; to conceive mentally.

See alsoEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English fantasy. Doublet of fantasie.

NounEdit

fantasy f

  1. (literature) fantasy (literary genre)

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English fantasy. Doublet of fantaisie.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fantasy f (plural fantasys)

  1. (literature) fantasy (literary genre)

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From English fantasy.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): //fanˈta.zɨ// invalid IPA characters (//)

NounEdit

fantasy n (indeclinable)

  1. (literature) fantasy (genre)

AdjectiveEdit

fantasy (not comparable)

  1. fantastical (of or pertaining to fantasy)

DeclensionEdit

Indeclinable.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • fantasy in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • fantasy in Polish dictionaries at PWN