See also: mansuétude

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Via Middle French mansuetude or directly from Latin mansuētūdō, from mansuētus, perfect passive participle of mansuēscō(I tame), from manus(hand) + suēscō(become accustomed).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mansuetude ‎(countable and uncountable, plural mansuetudes)

  1. (archaic) Gentleness, tameness.
    • 1647, Henry Hammond, Of Fraternal Admonition Or Correption (page 5)
      That I use all mildness or mansuetude in admonishing; the angry passionate correption being rather apt to provoke, than to amend.
    • 1972, Patrick O'Brian, Post Captain:
      Quo me rapis? Quo indeed. My whole conduct, meekness, mansuetude, voluntary abasement, astonishes me.
    • 2008 October 8, Angry Professor, “A malison on the poor of spirit.”, in A Gentleman's C[1]:
      With mansuetude (compossible with my muliebrity), I condemn those niddering, olid morons who, in caliginosity of understanding, vilipend our English by attempting to exuviate words for which they cannot see any present custom.

TranslationsEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

mansuetude f (plural mansuetudes)

  1. mansuetude; tameness

SynonymsEdit