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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French marge, from Latin margo, of Germanic origin.

NounEdit

marge (plural marges)

  1. (archaic) margin; edge; verge.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 4 scene 1
      [] And thy sea-marge, sterile and rocky-hard,
      Where thou thyself dost air [...]
    • 1874, James Thomson, The City of Dreadful Night
      the long curved crest
      Which swells out two leagues from the river marge.
    • 1907, Robert W. Service, “The Cremation of Sam McGee”, in The Spell of the Yukon and Other Verses:
      Till I came to the marge of Lake Lebarge, and a derelict there lay; / It was jammed in the ice, but I saw in a trice it was called the "Alice May". / And I looked at it, and I thought a bit, and I looked at my frozen chum; / Then "Here", said I, with a sudden cry, "is my cre-ma-tor-eum."

Etymology 2Edit

Shortened from the word margarine.

NounEdit

marge (usually uncountable, plural marges)

  1. (colloquial, Britain, New Zealand) margarine.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan [Term?] (compare Occitan marge), from Latin margō, marginem (compare French marge, Portuguese margem), from Proto-Indo-European *merǵ-, marǵ-.

NounEdit

marge m (plural marges)

  1. margin, edge
  2. (economics) margin

Related termsEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

marge f or m (plural marges, diminutive margetje n)

  1. margin

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, from Latin margō, marginem, from Proto-Indo-European *merǵ-, marǵ-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

marge f (plural marges)

  1. margin (of paper, etc)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse margir.

AdjectiveEdit

marge pl (comparative flair)

  1. Many.

Derived termsEdit