EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English brinke, from Old Norse *brenka, *brinka, from Proto-Germanic *brinkaz (hill, edge (of land)), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰren- (project). Cognate with Dutch brink (grassland), dialectal German Brunkel, Icelandic brekka (slope); also Tocharian B prenke (island), Irish braine (prow).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brink (plural brinks)

  1. The edge, margin, or border of a steep place, as of a precipice; a bank or edge.
    the brink of a river
  2. (figuratively) The edge or border
    the brink of success
    He's on the brink of madness.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch brinc, from Old Dutch brink, from Proto-Germanic *brinkaz.

Cognate with English brink.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /brɪŋk/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: brink
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋk

NounEdit

brink m (plural brinken, diminutive brinkje n)

  1. village green, functioning as a central square
  2. edge or margin of a field
  3. edge or margin of a hill
  4. grassy edge or margin of a strip of land
  5. grassland

Derived termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

brink

  1. Alternative form of brinke