See also: Marron and marrón

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Variant form of maroon (chestnut), later reinforced by French marron.

NounEdit

marron (plural marrons)

  1. A sweet chestnut. [from 19th c.]
    • 2007, Craig Silvey, Jasper Jones, Allen & Unwin 2007, p. 137:
      ‘I mean, shit, even if I had've come down here of a weekend and taken back a sack full of marron, I would have killed the pig up there.’
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
A marron
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Wikipedia

From Nyunga marran.

NounEdit

marron (plural marrons)

  1. Cherax tenuimanus, a species of freshwater crayfish from Western Australia.
SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French marron (feral; fugitive, adjective), from Spanish cimarrón (fugitive, wild, feral), from Taíno simaran.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɑˈrɔn/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: mar‧ron
  • Rhymes: -ɔn

NounEdit

marron m (plural marrons)

  1. Maroon (a member of ethnic groups in the Americas descended from Africans who escaped slavery and established free communities; (Suriname) a member of a major Afro-Surinamese ethnic group that consists of several tribes and is based mostly in the hinterland; (historical) escaped slave)
    • 1934, Anton de Kom, Wij slaven van Suriname [We Slaves of Suriname]‎[1], Amsterdam: Contact, page 104:
      Bij de overrompeling van een der laatste benden werden twintig Marrons gedood, waaronder Bonni, Cormantijn, Codjo en Paedje. Zij behoorden tot het gespuis, zooals destijds de blanken de Marrons noemden, maar voor ons zijn en blijven zij helden, Surinamers die hun waardigheid van aanvoerders door dapperheid en deugd verworven hadden, vechters voor de rechten en vrijheid der Surinaamsche slaven.
      When one of the last gangs was ambushed, twenty Maroons were killed, including Bonni, Cormantijn, Codjo, and Paedje. They were part of the rabble, as the whites used to call the Maroons at the time, but to us they are and will always be heroes, Surinamese who had earned their status as leaders through bravery and virtue, fighters for the rights and freedom of the Surinamese slaves.
    • 2017 November 3, Euritha Tjan A Way, “Internationaal bundelen [Uniting internationally]”, in De Ware Tijd[2], retrieved 9 July 2021:
      Het is 10 oktober, de dag waarop marrons vieren dat er in 1760 vrede is afgedwongen van de koloniale overheersers.
      It's 10 October, the day Maroons celebrate that peace was exacted from the colonial oppressors in 1760.
    Synonyms: bosneger, boslandcreool

FinnishEdit

NounEdit

marron

  1. Genitive singular form of marto.

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Italian marrone.

NounEdit

marron m (plural marrons)

  1. horse-chestnut
  2. chestnut
  3. chestnut brown
  4. A token used as a control of the presence of someone at his post
  5. (pyrotechnics) firecracker (on a rocket)
  6. (informal) punch (with the fist)
  7. (informal) head

AdjectiveEdit

marron (invariable)

  1. (France) brown
Usage notesEdit
  • This adjective is used mainly in France. Elsewhere, the usual adjective is brun.
  • Like most colors that take their name from animals and plants, the adjective is invariable. However, by analogy with the corresponding noun which has a plural, some people may erroneously consider it variable in number and use marrons as the plural.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit
  • Asturian: marrón
  • Catalan: marró
  • Galician: marrón
  • Portuguese: marrom
  • Spanish: marrón

Etymology 2Edit

From a West Indies creole, from Spanish cimarrón; see that entry for more.

AdjectiveEdit

marron (feminine marronne, masculine plural marrons, feminine plural marronnes)

  1. that has become wild again (used of a slave or animal who has returned to a free or wild state)
  2. illicit, crooked (of professions)
    magie marronnehedge magic

NounEdit

marron m (plural marrons, feminine marronne)

  1. maroon (a slave or animal who has run away to live free)

Further readingEdit