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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Variant form of maroon (chestnut), later reinforced by French marron.

NounEdit

marron (plural marrons)

  1. A sweet chestnut. [from 19th c.]
    • 2007, Craig Silvey, Jasper Jones, Allen & Unwin 2007, p. 137:
      ‘I mean, shit, even if I had've come down here of a weekend and taken back a sack full of marron, I would have killed the pig up there.’
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

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Nyunga marran

NounEdit

marron (plural marrons)

  1. Cherax tenuimanus, a type of freshwater crayfish from Western Australia.
SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French marron (feral; fugitive, adjective), from Spanish cimarrón (fugitive, wild, feral), from Taíno simaran.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɑˈrɔn/
  • Hyphenation: mar‧ron
  • Rhymes: -ɔn

NounEdit

marron m (plural marrons)

  1. Maroon (descendant of escaped African slaves in the Americas or Caribbean; escaped slave)
    Synonyms: bosneger, boslandcreool

FinnishEdit

NounEdit

marron

  1. Genitive singular form of marto.

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ma.ʁɔ̃/
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Italian marrone.

NounEdit

marron m (plural marrons)

  1. horse-chestnut
  2. chestnut
  3. chestnut brown
  4. A token used as a control of the presence of someone at his post
  5. (pyrotechnics) firecracker (on a rocket)
  6. (informal) punch (with the fist)
  7. (informal) head

AdjectiveEdit

marron (invariable)

  1. (France) brown
Usage notesEdit
  • This adjective is used mainly in France. Elsewhere, the usual adjective is brun.
  • Like all colors that take their name from animals and plants, this sense of the adjective is invariable. However, by analogy with the corresponding noun which has a plural, some people may erroneously consider it variable in number and use marrons as the plural.
DescendantsEdit
  • Asturian: marrón
  • Catalan: marró
  • Galician: marrón
  • Spanish: marrón

Etymology 2Edit

From a West Indies creole, from Spanish cimarrón, from cima.

AdjectiveEdit

marron (feminine singular marronne, masculine plural marrons, feminine plural marronnes)

  1. that has become wild again (used of a slave or animal who has returned to a free or wild state)
  2. illicit, crooked (of professions)
    magie marronnehedge magic

NounEdit

marron m (plural marrons, feminine marronne)

  1. maroon (a slave or animal who has run away to live free)

Further readingEdit