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See also: médiéval

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French médiéval (middle), from Latin medium (middle) + aevum (age).

PronunciationEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

AdjectiveEdit

medieval (comparative more medieval, superlative most medieval)

  1. Of or relating to the Middle Ages, the period from approximately 500 to 1500 AD.
  2. Having characteristics associated with the Middle Ages in popular, modern cultural perception:
    1. Archaic.
    2. Brutal.
      • 1969 March 24, New York Magazine, page 58:
        Brute force can get you into any apartment if you want to get medieval about it.
      • 2003, Robert Ludlum, The Janson Directive, page 579:
        "Oh, what a nifty idea," Collins said dryly. "Get a bunch of angry brothers with a blowtorch and some pliers and get medieval on his ass."

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

medieval (plural medievals)

  1. Someone living in the Middle Ages.
  2. A medieval example (of something aforementioned or understood from context).
    • Thank God for modern remedies: the medievals were often useless or even harmful.

TranslationsEdit


AragoneseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

medieval

  1. medieval

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

medieval (masculine and feminine plural medievals)

  1. medieval

GalicianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

medieval m, f (plural medievais)

  1. medieval

PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

medieval m, f (plural medievais, comparable)

  1. medieval

SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /medjeˈbal/, [meðjeˈβal]

AdjectiveEdit

medieval (plural medievales)

  1. medieval

Further readingEdit