See also: ævum

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Latin aevum, in the technical sense of Scholastic philosophy. Doublet of aye.

NounEdit

aevum (uncountable)

  1. (philosophy) the mean between time and eternity; the state of being of the angels and saints in heaven

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Earlier aevom, aivom, from Proto-Italic *aiwom (period, age), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eyu- (long time, lifetime).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aevum n (genitive aevī); second declension

  1. (principally): time as a single, unified, continuous and limitless entity; infinite time, time without end; to wit: eternity, agelessness, timelessness
    Synonym: aeternitās
  2. (restrictedly): an undefined, particularly long period of time: an age, an era, a term, a duration
    Synonym: aetās
  3. (restrictedly, pertaining to a person): generation, lifetime, lifespan
    Synonym: aetās
  4. (Medieval Latin, philosophy) aevum, the mean between time and eternity, aeviternity

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative aevum aeva
Genitive aevī aevōrum
Dative aevō aevīs
Accusative aevum aeva
Ablative aevō aevīs
Vocative aevum aeva

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Italian: evo
  • Portuguese: evo
  • Romanian: ev
  • Spanish: evo
  • Serbo-Croatian: eon

ReferencesEdit

  • aevum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • aevum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • aevum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • aevum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette