Contents

EsperantoEdit

VerbEdit

metus

  1. conditional of meti

IdoEdit

VerbEdit

metus

  1. conditional of metar

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown origin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

metus m ‎(genitive metūs); fourth declension

  1. fear, dread
  2. anxiety

InflectionEdit

Fourth declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative metus metūs
genitive metūs metuum
dative metuī metibus
accusative metum metūs
ablative metū metibus
vocative metus metūs

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • metus in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • metus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • metus in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be comprised under the term 'fear.: sub metum subiectum esse
    • a man is paralysed with fear: metus aliquem exanimat (Mil. 24. 65)
    • to grow pale with fear: exalbescere metu
    • to be completely prostrated by fear: metu fractum et debilitatum, perculsum esse
    • to recover from one's fright: a metu respirare (Cluent. 70. 200)
    • to recover from one's fright: ex metu se recreare, se colligere
Read in another language