See also: Awe

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English aw, awe, agh, awȝe, borrowed from Old Norse agi, from Proto-Germanic *agaz (terror, dread), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂egʰ- (to be upset, afraid). Displaced native Middle English eye, eyȝe, ayȝe, eȝȝe, from Old English ege, æge (fear, terror, dread), from the same Proto-Germanic root.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

awe (usually uncountable, plural awes)

  1. A feeling of fear and reverence.
    • 2012 March-April, Anna Lena Phillips, “Sneaky Silk Moths”, in American Scientist[1], volume 100, number 2, page 172:
      Last spring, the periodical cicadas emerged across eastern North America. Their vast numbers and short above-ground life spans inspired awe and irritation in humans—and made for good meals for birds and small mammals.
  2. A feeling of amazement.
  3. (archaic) Power to inspire awe.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

awe (third-person singular simple present awes, present participle awing or aweing, simple past and past participle awed)

  1. (transitive) To inspire fear and reverence in.
    • 1922, Michael Arlen, “1/1/3”, in “Piracy”: A Romantic Chronicle of These Days[2]:
      That large room had always awed Ivor: even as a child he had never wanted to play in it, for all that it was so limitless, the parquet floor so vast and shiny and unencumbered, the windows so wide and light with the fairy expanse of Kensington Gardens.
  2. (transitive) To control by inspiring dread.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GunEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Gbe *-ve or Proto-Gbe *-we. Cognates include Fon àwè, Saxwe Gbe owè, Adja eve, Ewe eve

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

àwè

  1. two

AdjectiveEdit

àwè

  1. two

Related termsEdit

1 - ɖòkpó, dòpó 2 3 - atɔ̀n, atọ̀n
cardinal number àwè
ordinal number àwètɔ́, àwètọ́

MaoriEdit

NounEdit

awe

  1. soot
  2. white feather

MapudungunEdit

AdverbEdit

awe (Raguileo spelling)

  1. quickly, promptly.
  2. soon

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Wixaleyiñ: Mapucezugun-wigkazugun pici hemvlcijka (Wixaleyiñ: Small Mapudungun-Spanish dictionary), Beretta, Marta; Cañumil, Dario; Cañumil, Tulio, 2008.

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Old Norse agi, from Proto-Germanic *agaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂égʰos. Doublet of eye.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

awe (uncountable)

  1. awe, wonder, reverence
  2. fear, horror
  3. that which elicits or incites horror; something horrifying
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: awe
  • Scots: awe, aw

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

AdverbEdit

awe

  1. Alternative form of away

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

awe

  1. Alternative form of ewe

PapiamentuEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • awé (alternative spelling)

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese hoje and Spanish hoy and Kabuverdianu ochi.

PronounEdit

awe

  1. today

SwahiliEdit

VerbEdit

awe

  1. inflection of -wa:
    1. third-person singular subjunctive affirmative
    2. m-wa class subject inflected singular subjunctive affirmative

TabaruEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

awe

  1. a thread

ReferencesEdit

  • Edward A. Kotynski (1988), “Tabaru phonology and morphology”, in Work Papers of the Summer Institute of Linguistics, University of North Dakota Session, volume 32, Summer Institute of Linguistics

Western ArrernteEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

awe

  1. yes

YorubaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

àwé

  1. friend
    Synonyms: ọ̀rẹ́, olùkù
  2. an unknown person
    Táni àwé yẹn?Who is that unknown person?

Usage notesEdit

  • More commonly used in Central Yoruba dialects

ReferencesEdit

  • Aremo, Bolaji (2012) How Yoruba and Igbo Became Different Languages[3], Scribo Publications, →ISBN